FESTIVAL m3 / ART IN SPACE 9.6.—30.9.2018 PRAHA 1

ARTISTS

Hynek Alt (*1976, CZ)

Matyáš Chochola (*1986, CZ)

Jasmina Cibic (*1979, SI)

Viktor Dedek (*1993, CZ)

Deniz Eroglu (*1981, DK)

Feld72

Liam Gillick (*1964, UK)

Anna Hulačová (*1984, CZ)

Christian Jankowski (*1968, DE)

Barbara Kapusta (*1983, AT)

David Maljković (*1973, HR)

Christoph Meier (*1980, AT)

Ute Müller (*1978, AT)


Antonis Pittas (*1973, GR)


Boris Ondreička (*1969, SK)

Lisa Reitmeier (*1984, DE)


Sofie Thorsen (*1971, DK)

































































































































Hynek Alt


Klementinum, at the entrance to the public study of the national library
Mariánské nám. 5, Staré Město
Open: Mon–Sat, 9 AM – 7 PM
50°05'13.2"N 14°24'59.6"E
Real-time 3D render on screens located

Silently ticking clocks, seemingly clearly defining a field without place for error, at least until you start to challenge the given.

Untitled (Tower Clock), 2018


The synchronisation of time is something that we usually take for granted. Our beloved technological accessories independently switch from standard to Daylight Saving Time or from our native time zone to an unknown one without us even noticing until one day when the battery in our wristwatch (mostly worn for style-related reasons) runs out and we are briefly reminded of the artificiality as well as omnipresence of this system. Hynek Alt aims to mine the potential that lies in the small glitches, drifts and skews of the clock, born of technical imperfections - nuisance to a society enslaved to ever increasing productivity through optimisation it could just the same be the key to its emancipation.

Transferring the actual tower clock of Klementinum not only to the ground floor, right next to the public study room, but also into a real-time render, the concept of synchronised time as a social construct dictating our life and work balance is questioned and its futility and fragility further emphasised in a momentary image which is recreated over and over again.

The first recorded occasion of time synchronisation came with the introduction of railway time in England in 1840. It was a tool needed to avoid accidents, near misses and offer a valid timetable for passengers with different local times and conductors alike. As railway networks expanded, synchronised time was exported to other parts of the world and created new standard times influenced by geography, industrial developments and political governance.

Klementinum may have very well laid the cornerstone for this development. Every year it attracts legions of tourists, mostly for its famous baroque library and view from the astronomical tower, but it also has a rich history related to scientific research and academia, especially in the field of astronomy as it saw famous astronomers such as Johannes Kepler and Tycho Brahe go in and out, making it a centre for astronomical and later meteorological measurements. Apart from a vast collection of astronomical equipment there is one room, which was devoted to the precise determination of noon, the so-called Meridian Hall, where a ray of light traversing the wall and space hits a string stretched across the room at precisely 12 o’clock every day moving from left to right in the course of a year therefore simultaneously performing as a camera obscura.

Hynek Alt was born in 1976. He lives and works in Prague.

Shifting between photography, video, object and installation, he is concerned with forms of perception of the human in the current digital era and the navigation in between physical surroundings and constructed social systems. He uses generic objects and situations, analyses them and changes the way of their presentation, while questioning their purpose. He employs at times widely accessible and cheap technologies (photography, Xerox, offset) aiming at precision, specificity and thorough research while usually arriving at a very general outcome and at times high-tech methods (3D scanning, 3D rendering) to achieve the opposite. His work consists of either a combination of different elements or isolation of one from the other to create new tension and layers of possible reading while challenging their usual hierarchy.

Since 2017 he is head of the Studio of Photography and New Media at FAMU, Prague. From 2008-2016 Hynek Alt was head of the photography studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague, together with Aleksandra Vajd.

His work has been shown at Fotograf Gallery in Prague, House of Art, Česke Budějovice, Futura Gallery in Prague and Rudolfinum Prague, Škuc Gallery Ljubljana, Slovenia, Plato, Ostrava, National Gallery, Prague, <rotor>, Graz, Galerie Fait, Brno, Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo, Mumok, Vienna, Drdova Gallery Prague, among others.

Matyáš Chochola


September 18, 6pm
Kozí plácek (intersection of Kozí and Haštalská streets)
Performance

The cathartic experience of a Mad-Max-like tour through the city - how far can you push the boundaries of a parking lot?

The Master of the Golden Cut, 2018


Chochola’s project for VICE VERSA uses the performative and participatory qualities of his oeuvre to pinpoint specific blind spots in the city’s legislation in regards to the private use of public spaces for entertainment purposes. Putting a spotlight on the idea of never-ending entertainment and joy of temporary visitors of Prague, he formulates an even stronger contrast of the already quite disparate lack of balance between lives of visitors and local residents. His idea is to orchestrate a migrating concert and a series of improvised performances all around the historical city, using means usually reserved for paying tourists and offer a cathartic experience to a widest possible audience of locals and visitors alike.

Cars and paid parking lots function as Chochola’s stage. Prague is full of very specific vehicles for sightseeing rides: horse carriages, old-timers, elongated 90s looking limousines with darkened windows and during certain occasions even huge jeeps equipped with additional speakers cruise the streets playing advertisements or military cars of some dubious interest groups, friends of military history or possibly film crews shooting a movie. Chochola rents or arranges through personal deals the use of such vehicles for his performance organized together with various musicians, jugglers and students of improvised theatre from the Academy of performative arts in Prague. Each car, “equipped” with a whole group of artists will drive through the city center, playing music, finding a suitable parking spot and presenting an unexpected street event.

It is important for Chochola to hold all that will be happening strictly legal, that means, driving and parking only on allowed designated areas, not stepping out of the car where such a gesture would change the status of the event to a regular street performance for which one needs a permit. His idea evolves around the exploration of the difference between public and private spaces in the city. When you drive your car with very loud music during the day, no one can interfere. When you park in an official parking spot and pay the fee, the spot is yours for those couple of minutes. Suddenly you “own” the space for your 15 minutes of fame. How far can you go in carving out a space for the unexpected while still abiding to the laws and regulations? How will the audience react? Will they think that they are witnessing just another tourist attraction or that there is something more to it? Will someone intervene or join the “band”? Let’s see how far the boundaries will be pushed.

Matyáš Chochola was born in 1986. He lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

He graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague and Universität der Künste in Berlin. He works primarily in the media of installation and performance. His body of work represents a richly composed universe whose integral part is constituted by the figure of the artist himself. Chochola experiments with post-internet aesthetics, an unorthodox yet sophisticated combination of the symbols of the present and its ancient roots. Trash objects meet precise glass-making techniques, spilled colour meets silk painting, the poetry of shamanism meets 90’s disco.

He has introduced his work, among others, at Manifesta 11 in Zurich, the Grimmuseum in Berlin, SVIT Gallery and the National Gallery in Prague. In 2012, Chochola received the Václav Chad Award at the 6th Zlín Youth Salon. In 2016 he received the Jindřich Chalupecký Award for his show Magic, Exotic, Erotic in the National Gallery in Prague.

www.matyaschochola.cz

Jasmina Cibic


National Museum
Vinohradská 1, Nové Město
Various locations in the building
Installation will be open from June 29 until the end of the festival.
Open: Mon–Sun, 10 AM – 6 PM except Wed, 9 AM – 6 PM;
every first Wednesday in a month 10 AM – 8 PM
50°04'47.8"N 14°25'54.2"E
Botanical illustrations

The former Federal Assembly, a collection of imaginary new rose variants representing the botanical hybrid between the rose Europa and roses named after the founding fathers of the European Union.

The Flower Effect, 2018


Jasmina Cibic’s new project materializes as a direct but unfinished dialogue between botany and ideological belonging, questioning their reciprocal influences in the formulation of the search for national and ideological symbols and their echoes in the present day.

Placed in Prague's former Federal Assembly, Cibic’s project finds a worthy host in the utopian architecture of Karel Prager finished in 1974, which later functioned as the headquarters of Radio Free Europe and currently serves as the temporary main building of the National Museum.

Within the former parliament building, The Flower Effect will present a number of illustrations Cibic created in collaboration with scientific botanical illustrators – showing a compositions of fictitious rose hybrids cross-pollinated between the Europa rose, (1928) and those bearing the names of the founding fathers of the European Union – an all-male politician cast, namely the Sir Winston Churchill Rose (1955); Konrad Adenauer Rose (1954), Jean Monnet Rose, (1988), Souvenir de Robert Schuman Rose® (1998), Mansholt Rose (1966), Victor Hugo® Rose (1985), Mazzini Rose (1925), Natali Rose (1981) and the Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt Rose (1933).

Up until the 19th century, rose hybridisation was a spontaneous occurrence, mediated by pollinating insects, or self-pollination. Controlled pollination of roses to create new varieties was first systematically practised by Empress Josephine's horticulturalist, Andre Dupont, when direct links between rose hybridisation, new rose varieties and systems of (inter)national power and diplomacy were established. These remain present today - most famously within spaces of national power such as the White House Rose Garden, which also gave the name to Rose Garden Strategy - furthering the contextual link between the scenographic spectacle of the roses, their names - and statecraft.

As symbols of sexualized and political desire throughout history, roses continue to be used to commemorate national belonging through allegories, names of countries and their politicians. Throughout the 20th century, one can clearly trace the upheavals of nationalisms and moments of awakening of national consciousness through specific times when naming new rose hybrids and naming them after notions and icons of national “treasures” is most prevalent.

Cibic’s project stems from the complete lack of female presence in the laying of foundations for the European Union – which is juxtaposed with the female allegory representing the very union of national states the founding fathers were creating: Europa herself. Similar to the new floral hybrids created by cross-pollination – they themselves are prone to chance and external conditions, announcing the fragility of new political unions and ideologies.

Jasmina Cibic was born 1979 in Ljubljana.

She works in film, sculpture, performance and installation to explore “soft power” – how political rhetoric is deployed through art and architecture, particularly examining how cultural production is used by the state to communicate certain principles and aspirations. Through unfolding the complex entanglements of art, gender and state power, the artist encourages viewers to consider the strategies employed in the construction of national culture. Her multi-layered approach draws together primary sources and interconnected narratives, creating shifting meanings and highlighting historical uncertainties and untruths.

Jasmina represented Slovenia at the 55th Venice Biennale. Her work was shown at BALTIC Gateshead, MSU Zagreb, MOCA Belgrade, MGLC Ljubljana, CCS BARD, Guangdong Museum of Art China, La Panacee Montpellier, MSUM Ljubljana and MNHA Luxembourg. Cibic’s films have been screened at FIAC Paris, HKW Berlin, Les Rencontres Internationales Paris and Copenhagen International Documentary Festival. In 2016 Jasmina Cibic has been nominated for the Jarman Award and was the winner of the MAC International Ulster Bank and Charlottenborg Fonden Awards.

Viktor Dedek


June 11, 4pm
Courtyard, passageway between Spálená and Opatovická
50°04'46.4"N 14°25'07.4"E
Performance

A digital courtyard as a space between you and your screen, translated into the physical reality of the urban landscape.

Play Today - Courtyard Ludology, 2018


Our era of massive democratization of the omnipresent digital realm is radically redefining the perception of public space per se. We still behave as we have been for millennia, moving through natural or urban landscapes, interacting with our environment and dividing its roles and functions. Yet the widespread digital interfaces are allowing us to immerse ourselves more and more into a parallel space, one that creates a fully virtual experience and reality, scrolling through endless streams of Instagram posts, or managing your emails while walking. Viktor Dedek is focusing on one specific field of digital imagination: the gaming industry, perceived as a cross generational entertainment.

Dedek decides to merge the layers of two planes of existence, the real cityscape with character and specific rules of various computer games. Bringing the experience of gaming from the screen to the streets. The result of such an attempt resonates on the margins of performance, writing, theatre and sculptural practice. A series of events will take place throughout the duration of the festival, uncovering one by one a specific narrative, similarly to when you are watching a TV show.

As with most of the games, a certain level of linearity, no matter how strongly interrupted, is involved and thus each event shares a starting point, which will most likely also serve also as a destination. As this point of departure, Dedek selects a hidden courtyard, functioning as a passageway in between two streets. For Dedek the courtyard symbolizes a pre-digital past, a place where kids played their own games before they moved to protected zones of mental courtyards, spaces between them and their screens.

Each event will produce a sculptural trace, and a piece of writing presented in the form of a newspaper. Both media, once again, referencing the pre-digital past and their contrast to our here and now.

Viktor Dedek was born in 1993. He lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

Dedek is a student of the sculpture studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design. His practice evolves around precise strategies of the semiotic analysis by means of the sculptural medium. His recent interest in theatre and performance functions as an enhancement to his previous installation work and synthesises a certain sense of romantic poetics with pragmatic conceptualism.

He has shown his work at Galerie Jelení in Prague and participated in a series of group shows, for instance at Prague City Gallery, House of Arts in Brno and the gallery of Academy of Fine Arts in Prague.


Deniz Eroglu


Stone Bell House, Cellar
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město
Entrance from Týnská street
Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Film work

An unexpected turn of your vacation, instead of a medieval city you find yourself in the Turkish highlands. Are you even allowed to be here?

A Vacation, 2018


Often our ways of travelling are rather reckless, our clumsy attempts to experience a culture is increasing ignorance or resulting in damage and at times our naive wishes to broaden our worldview provoke the exact opposite, reinforcing feelings of superiority and privilege.

Abducting us into a cinematographic world of serene imagery and soothing landscapes we accompany a solitary traveller into the calm of the Turkish highlands. A very different kind of vacation than the one we can witness or experience in the city centre of Prague ensues, not only providing us with stark contrast in order to question growing tendencies to consume cheap, fast and superficial city trips but also addressing questions of lacking freedom of speech, possibilities of criticism and subversive alternatives to protest.

The swift change from the crowded streets of the city center into the cool and quiet cellar are partially intended as a break from the tourist frenzy close by, but we can only lay back and relax briefly, as we realise that underneath the alluring cinematic experience a story of personal protest unfolds, reminding us that the possibility to speak out depends very much on the geo-political context, same as our rights to travel and cross borders - one can be barred from entering a country for uttering unpleasant comments on Facebook, people are being held or imprisoned on pure suspicion with no formal charges - and not only in Turkey, where our lone anti-hero operates, but in many parts of Europe where we are facing transgressions and regression to laws that go against human connection or trust and climates of fear and anxiety are instigated and kept alive to support right-wing agitators by imposing censorship, control and violence into people's lives and privacy.

Deniz Eroglu was born 1981 in Denmark. He lives and works in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

While over the last years Deniz Eroglu’s practice has gradually opened up to other formats besides video and film encompassing different media such as sculptures, installations and text his source material has been narrowed down to the artist’s ancestry, history and personal biography. Eroglu has long exhibited a strong interest in characters that inhabit the margins of society and are in some way vulnerable or subject to persecution; be it melancholic hermits, bedridden patients or emaciated peasants, to name a few examples. The main themes being vulnerability and displacement within his own personal context.

Deniz Eroglu graduated from Städelschule in 2014. He was a resident artist at the Rijksakademie from 2016-17. His work has been shown amongst others at MMK, Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden, the Marrakech Biennial and Kunsthalle Krems.

www.denizeroglu.net

Feld72


Klárov, the park under the Old Castle Stairs
Malá Strana
50°05'31.0"N 14°24'32.4"E
Information panel

Proposals for the festival m3 / Art in space/ Kunsthalle Praha


Viennese architectural studio feld72 worked closely with the curatorial team of VICE VERSA and Kunsthalle Praha on the development of a new site-responsive structure, fulfilling a double role: firstly as a sculptural form, secondly as a pavilion for VICE VERSA providing a wide range of social activities to vivify the area right under the stairs leading to the Prague Castle, neighbouring with the Waldstein Riding School on one side and the future Kunsthalle Praha on the other. For a long time this particular piece of greenery was missing for any specific purpose, it’s too noisy due to closeness to the busy road and it’s quite hidden, being located slightly below the street level. Basically it doesn’t serve as a public park, rather as a passageway from A to B.

Such conditions were ideal for feld72 to make an attempt to redevelop the park and give it a new identity. The first monumental proposal was referencing surrounding walls, creating a new one with a multiplicity of functions, as an outdoors exhibition space, a cafe as well as a place for screenings, lectures and discussions. Giving its visitors an opportunity to experience a different view, both literally and metaphorically and to re-evaluate their relationship to the park. Due to variable and case-specific regulations in regards of the usage of public space and green areas, it was not possible to implement this version. The second proposal approached the area in a more mobile and transformative way. Bringing two separate movable architectural modules to the park and proposing similar functions as the first one, but in a more compact and portable fashion. Kunsthalle Praha plans to realise the project after their official opening at 2020.

The curatorial teams of VICE VERSA and Kunsthalle Praha, together with feld72, eventually decided to give space to these so far unrealised projects in the form of a presentation of sketches, drawings and references to allow our visitors to imagine the possible potential of these pavilions. As a placeholder for these projects an adapted fragment of an older work of feld72 realized in 2016 in the Viennese Hofburg was selected to serve as a small-scale temporary architecture exhibition. Unrealized projects and even their representation and circulation have a long tradition in the field of architecture, as it is not only a profession subjected to a questionable system of excessive unpaid labour, mostly in competitions, but also complex and fragile project structures that often fail to endure as well as a widespread disregard and ignorance in relation to outlay and complexity of architectural labour.

Now, on your way to the Prague Castle or maybe just during a slight detour from the nearby subway stop you can enjoy at least the vision of a potential transformation, accompanied by a sculptural map of Prague 1, area hosting all of VICE VERSA projects.

The work of feld72 pivots on the interface of architecture, applied urbanism and art. feld72 has implemented numerous projects of various dimensions in the national and international context, a huge range including master plans, buildings, studies on urban development, interior and exhibition design, urban strategies and large-scale interventions in the urban environment. The multiple award-winning works are remarkable for a socially responsible, innovative and sustainable approach to architecture and urbanism. Tracking down and reinforcing the potential in locations and (social) environments is a fundamental element of feld72 projects. Expanding the field of architecture within the context of the self-initiated project series “Urban Strategies”, the collective has been engaged ever since the office was founded in 2002 in Vienna in tackling the issues of the use and perception of the public space. Through numerous teaching assignments at universities the approach and methodology of feld72 have been integrated into the academic discourse.

Liam Gillick


Poster campaign throughout the city, festival homepage, spots in Aerofilms Cinemas

A visual identity for the Flat Earth Society and the sound of cheerful jingles leading us all to the Underground.

Flatter Earthed, 2018
A message from Miltiades, 2018
Fragment d’histoire future 1-3, 2018


Liam Gillick’s role for VICE VERSA could be described in various ways, as a critical commentator referencing current political and cultural climate, as an outside witness to the institutional functioning of the city of Prague and the festival itself, or as a formative agent for the creation of a visual identity of the festival.

Gillick conceived the main visual identifier of the festival, describable as its logo. Three parallel rings holding a name of the festival and its current title, suggesting a system of planetary rings missing the actual central body. It could be also read as a plain two-dimensional surface, referring to the recently medially present group of “Flat Earthers” - from the so-called Flat Earth Society, an organization promoting the assumption that our planet is one flat surface, rather than a sphere. At times, when the term post-truth spread from the academic discourse to the terminology of the general public, Gillick is using an example of “flat earthers” to directly refer to our lost ability to follow unified narratives.

The logo itself is accompanied by series of sound pieces - jingles if you will - presented on the festival’s home page, and in cinema spots distributed through Aerofilms.

The final layer of Gillick’s participation evolves from an older work named Underground (Fragments of Future Histories), an exhibition project and publication appropriating and adapting a 19th-century dystopian novel by Gabriel Tarde of the same name. Gillick selected a series of quotes from the novel, or rather from its script adaptation he created to address issues of precarious artistic production, policies of the city in regards to art in public space and the understanding, appreciation or a lack of interest from the general public.

Liam Gillick was born in 1964. He lives and works in New York, United States.

Gillick deploys multiple forms to expose the new ideological control systems that emerged at the beginning of the 1990s. He has developed a number of key narratives that often form the engine for a body of work. Gillick’s work exposes the dysfunctional aspects of a modernist legacy in terms of abstraction and architecture when framed within a globalized, neo-liberal consensus.

His work has been included in numerous important exhibitions including documenta and the Venice, Berlin and Istanbul Biennales - representing Germany in 2009 in Venice. Solo museum exhibitions have taken place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and Tate in London. Over the last twenty five years, Gillick has also been a prolific writer and critic of contemporary art – contributing to Artforum, October, Frieze and e-flux Journal. He is the author of a number of books including a volume of his selected critical writing. High profile public works include the British Government Home Office (Interior Ministry) building in London and the Lufthansa Headquarters in Frankfurt. Throughout this time Gillick has extended his practice into experimental venues and collaborative projects with artists including Philippe Parreno, Lawrence Weiner and Louise Lawler.

www.liamgillick.info

Anna Hulačová


Karlovo nám. 13, Nové Město
Entrance to the subway
50°04'33.8"N 14°25'08.3"E
Installation

Enlarged visitors from a micro environment, overcoming boundaries of time and space, manifesting themselves in a style referencing social civilism of the 1920s.

The Touches of Gods and Other Zooms, 2018


Anna Hulačová is slightly stepping out of the territory pinned down for VICE VERSA. She’s crossing the demarcation line of Prague 1 into Prague 2, still only a couple of hundreds of meters from the demarcated area. She is also fiercely zooming in, leaving our sensually perceivable environment and entering a micro world of bacteria and unicellular organisms, which she’s enlarging into a visually apprehensible scale. On top of it all, her intention plays with the various paces of travel through an urban fabric of the city, while placing her works next to the entrance or exit of the subway. As if she would like to compare the time spent walking on the surface and moving in an accelerated fashion under the ground by means of the public transportation system. In this respect, her work already starts in the heart of the city centre, at a nearby station on the B line, crossing just one stop, re-appearing on the surface and giving us a chance of actually seeing and experiencing her physical work. Like ancient gods travelled at a supernatural pace across the world as they pleased, or like the Christian God is allegedly omnipresent at all places at once. Those are Hulačová’s Touches of Gods. Same as the power illustrated in the decision to completely change the scales of living organisms, a method known rather from Hollywood film production, for instance think of the first silver screen appearance of King Kong in 1933, the Ant-Man in the latest Marvel addition to an endless line of superheroes, or any enlarged creature entering with its new dimensions not only a new realm of existence, but also of perception and emotion, and not necessarily fear of a threatening Other invading our world, as it could just the same be a friendly visit, from one plane to the other.

Hulačová’s typical references to the style of social civilism of the 1920s gives The Touches of Gods and Other Zooms its aesthetic character as well as a relationship to the history of art in public space from the period of modernism, merging with the specific style of the 1970s, when this particular subway entrance was designed.

The time, the space, the scale and our human perception are in flux, as if they were loosing any boundaries and allowing us to perceive their unending diversity at the same time, granted for a moment by the Touch of Gods. Hulačová is offering this shifted reading and understanding of a city as an organism in constant transformation, suggesting importance of subjective perception, which has a power to redefine the seemingly stable and given reality.

Anna Hulačová was born 1984 in Sušice. She lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

Hulačová's practice evolves around sculptures which revive traditional crafts, translating the inspiration found in ancient mythologies, eastern cultures as well as in Czech folk traditions and original Christian symbolism into the language of contemporary art.

She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague and was nominated for the Jindřich Chalupecký Award in 2016. Her work has been shown amongst others at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Meyer-Riegger in Berlin, Z20 Sara Zanin in Rome, Contemporary Art Centre in Vilnius and National Gallery in Prague.

Christian Jankowski


June 8, 10pm
June 9, 11am
Nám. Jana Palacha
Performance

The artist is present, dreaming, washing, drying, playing.

Leaving No Marks/ Playing Spree to Moldau, 2018


Jankowski is consciously coming to Prague as a visitor, or rather a visiting artist bearing gifts. A one-night and one-day long performance exposes the artist as a short-term traveller, coming for a brief moment to deal with his “business” and leave right afterwards. Spending the night in a selected hotel in the city center of Prague, Jankowski may or may not dream about his task at hand, but as it is with dreams, their outcome or mere occurrence is hard to predict. Nevertheless, the idea of sleeping, dreaming, sweating will leave an imprint in the hotel room and most intimately on the hotel bed sheets, which Jankowski will bring to a local laundromat to wash and remove all the marks of his bodily presence. Later on, he will leave the sheets to dry on the sculpture of Czech 19th-century painter Josef Mánes on the river bank of Vltava, situated between the Art Academy and Rudolfinum, Kunsthalle and seat of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, waiting patiently during the process under the sculpture itself, open to a discussion with passers-by departing from the idea of Leaving No Marks.

Jankowski is addressing the idea of constant jet-set of internationally acclaimed artists, as he himself represents, coming to places without much of a context to produce work on the basis of limited knowledge and leave, only oiling the machinery of global art scene exchange and its market. Besides the critical aspect of the work, Jankowski also opens up the topic of usage of representational parts of the city center for traditional household labour, changing a sculpture of canonical national artist to a clothes drying rack.

In the second part of his day, Jankowski will shift his focus from the urban structure of the city and its character to natural forces predating the city itself, specifically the river Vltava (Moldau in German) in a work called Playing Spree to Moldau and Vice Versa. With a set-up for a DJ session on the river bank of Vltava, Jankowski will play pre-recorded sounds of Berlin’s river Spree to the Vltava. Focusing on the significance of Vltava for Czech history and legends, taking into account the role of Bedřich Smetana’s symphony Má Vlast and its most notoriously known part named after the river. Upon his arrival back home to Berlin, Jankowski will swap roles, and present the sounds of Moldau to Spree. With this simple and poetic gesture, Jankowski connects the two poles of his voyage from Berlin to Prague, serenading two bodies of water which flow into Labe (Elbe) and exit the European mainland into the North Sea.

Christian Jankowski was born in 1968. He lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

By utilising the medium of human relationships, the comedic slapstick humour of Formulae, or indeed any of the other innumerable tools of modern communication available, Christian Jankowski trades blows with history, politics and the language of art. His works are almost always performances - both literally and figuratively - in so far as his carefully calibrated set-ups and interactive scenarios engage occasionally unsuspecting collaborators: televangelists, fortune tellers, border guards and professional magicians have all innocently colluded with him to become co-authors of his wide-ranging work.

Jankowski studied at the Academy of Fine Arts, Hamburg, Germany. Recent solo exhibitions include Kunsthaus Hamburg, Germany, Center for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw, Poland; Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros, Mexico City, Mexico; MACRO, Rome, Italy; Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany; Miami Art Museum, Florida, USA; MIT List Visual Art Center, Massachusetts, Cambridge, USA; Swiss Institute, New York, USA and the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, USA. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions “When I Give, I Give Myself”, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Project Los Altos (off-site show in Silicon Valley, staged by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, USA; Taipei Biennial, Taiwan; Sydney Biennial, Australia; the Whitney Biennial, New York, NY, USA and the Venice Biennale. In 2016, Jankowski curated the 11th edition of Manifesta, becoming the first artist to assume the role.

Barbara Kapusta


Theatre and Café NONA
Národní 4, Nové Město
Open: Mon–Fri, 9 AM – 12 AM,
Sat–Sun, 11 AM – 1 2AM
Holidays: July 10th – August 20th
50°04'52.5"N 14°24'52.7"E
Installation in the staircase

We demand to be public and exposed but not attacked/ we demand to be in public, seen, but private…
A silent play of four actors, transmitting their messages layered on precious marble.

We Make the Place by Playing, 2018


Barbara Kapusta invites us into a hybrid environment where culture and the commercial intersect and offer a space that is neither really public nor really private: the theatre and café NONA. It is its nature to not only to host theatre goers but a wider public in an extended system of hallways, entrees, sitting corners and toilets offering possibilities of rest, recreation and chit-chat.

Against this background Kapusta stages a play of her own, set in a fictional time and place, where public space has become massively privatized, controlled and policed. The four main protagonists Player, Speaker, Pointer and Sleeper take shape as ceramic sculptures and spread out over the venue. They initiate a difficult conversation about basic rights, strategies to reclaim public space, loitering, resting and playing that we can witness and interact with as a wall-text where the body has literally become the bearer of the message.

Barbara Kapusta was born in 1983. She lives and works in Vienna.

Kapusta's work almost exclusively departs from poetry and from there evolves into performance, film, sculpture or storytelling. She explores the relationship between the material nature of things and the physical existence of the observer as well as verbal and non-verbal language employed in this particular exchange of animate and inanimate participants.

Her objects, films and text-based works have recently been shown at, among others, Gianni Manhattan Vienna, KUP Athens, 21er Haus Vienna, Kunsthalle Vienna, Scriptings Berlin, Beautiful Gallery in Chicago and mumok cinema in Vienna.

www.barbarakapusta.net

David Maljković


Hotel Elysee, rooftop
Václavské nám. 43, Nové Město
50°04'52.8"N 14°25'41.7"E

Neon sign on the rooftop, best visibility between 7pm and 7am

A legacy of advertisement from the era of the modernist project, piercing through the current state of visual pollution of the city.

Dead Ad, 2018


The project of David Maljković for m3 Festival is smoothly sliding through his familiar tracks of excavation of historical links, formative for our present conditions. During his research trip to Prague, Maljković ventured into a variety of possible conceptual directions for his contribution but lastly decided to focus on the relation between the visual legacy of advertising from the times of the modernist project in relation to the current state of promotional pollution of the city. Since the only stable bearer of advertisement is architecture, while all the temporary structures are being frequently exchanged, Maljković was looking for modernistic houses which were since their inception used as placeholders of advertisement since the beginning.

After many considerations, a house in the upper part of Wenceslas Square was selected. A modernist house currently accommodating Hotel Elysee, right next to its style successor, the famous social realistic Hotel Jalta that was finished in the late 1950s. The rooftop of Hotel Elysee bears an empty and strangely anonymous metal construction, ready for a new advertisement, yet unused in the long term. Maljković decided to manifest his ideas through an installation made out of neon light tubes, animating that abandoned rooftop structure. Referencing old advertisement without clear quotation or reconstruction, but by manipulating and distorting and the idea of unpreserved historical material. The language of Dead Ad stays abstract and anonymous, as its placeholder itself. Enlightening a highly frequented central location in the city, staying invisible or being overlooked in its visually oversaturated context, or possibly creating a new beacon.

David Maljković was born 1973 in Rijeka, Croatia. He lives and works in Zagreb, Croatia.

His practice engages with the malleable relationship between form and content in aesthetic terms, or signifier and signified in linguistic terms. It is within this relationship that Maljković negotiates his formal methods and disjunctive intentions, discussing topics such as formalism of failed utopias.

After studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, David Maljković participated in several artist's residency programs including the one of the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. His work has been shown at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Secession Vienna, Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid, Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, 11th Gwangju Biennale and the 56. Biennale di Venezia, among others.

Christoph Meier


Church of Our Lady of the Snows x Austrian Cultural Forum, Courtyard
Jungmannovo nám. 18, Nové Město
50°04'58.5"N 14°25'22.3"E
Installation in the courtyard, composed of crowd control barriers

A crowd control mechanism with a mysterious purpose or unintelligible meaning, spreading as a modular structure, testing the qualities of the given space.

Untitled, 2018


In an attempt to not only activate areas in the public space in its traditional sense, but also address relationships between the outside and inside of the public space and institutions and their different gradients of privacy and publicity Meier counts on our preconditioned reading of ready-made guiding systems as a familiar structure.

Christoph Meier was born in 1980 in Vienna, Austria, where he lives and works.

By placing a series of crowd control barriers Meier imitates situations we very well know from airports, ticket counters or nightclubs and applies them to what is supposed to be an open public space. Playing with this ready-made guiding system, Meier draws attention to the use and misuse of the public space, yet remains mysterious in regards of the actual purpose or function of the barriers themselves as they seem to serve an event or institution that has yet failed to manifest itself rather pointing our attention to their inherent qualities prompting specific behaviour, relational hierarchies and distributing status between those in- and outside.

Meier’s intervention manifests itself in a modular structure, which in theory is adaptable to different scales and situations. One of the main interests of Meier’s practice could have its origin in the architecture of Adolf Loos, specifically Loos’s ability to transform spatially limited environments into networks of mirroring and spreading illusionary additions to existing architectural structures - the best example being the Viennese American Bar. His ongoing long term project is based on the idea of the construction of space-consuming ever-multiplying structures which penetrate various exhibition venues, without any apparent respect to their natural settings, copying a specific grid and thus testing qualities of the given space. In basic terms, he’s interested in the negotiation of overlapping grids, which delineate the void and in return become concept and content of his oeuvre.

Christoph Meier’s work considers the artistic intervention as a frame for social exchange, often alluding to mundane and popular spaces for interaction, such as the bar. Resorting to architectural strategies, such as the grid i.e. he reveals previously not visible conditions of the surrounding space, usually in a nonchalant and abstract way, where content and frame merge to accentuate the void. A void to be filled or reflected upon by the viewer.

Meier graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and received the MAK Schindler Scholarship. His work has been shown at Casino Luxembourg, KIOSK Ghent, Kunstverein Hamburg, French Pavilion in Zagreb and Kunsthaus Graz, amongst others.

www.christophmeier.net

Ute Müller


RSJ
Revoluční 30, Nové Město
On the back wall, facing the river, covered in ivy
50°05'33.1"N 14°25'39.3"E
Installation

A series of hands reaching out into a plane of merging national history and visions of future possibilities blinded by a mist of contradicting interests.

Untitled, 2018


Before the introduction of modern house numbers in 1770 a much more visual and sensual system, consisting of objects, animals and symbols was used to designate some particularly important or meaningful houses. Until then these signs were the only orientation device to locate a specific building. We can still find some such signs and people who still relate to them, even if in a more anecdotal and emotional way. The building of RSJ belongs to a broadly popular eclectic historical style of the 19th century, therefore it doesn’t have any sign of this sort on it’s facade, even though in reference to past times, even in the 19th century, many owners were adding their new signs according to this ancient tradition and so does Müller. Her interest in this particular building comes from its specific context: firstly, it is a highly frequented location, both in a historical and contemporary sense, it is close to the river, facing Letná park, thus functioning as an observation point of history with a view from the left to the Hanavský pavilion from the General Land Centennial Exhibition in 1891, then to a remnant of a former monument to the Stalinist era, and last but not least, a symbol of the re-defined route to modernism through the Czechoslovak presentation at the EXPO58 and its restaurant pavilion. It feels as if the whole modern historical narrative of the country is accounted for from this one specific point of view - a story of political and cultural changes. Secondly Müller choses this building, because of its future fate. Being in the battlefield of a highly political discussion about a possible redevelopment among contradicting and conflicting interests. Will the renowned architect Eva Jiřičná be allowed to design a new building at this spot? Will the Prague City Gallery use this spot for a sculpture of Richard Deacon? Will Alphonse Mucha finally get his long awaited pavilion for the famous series of paintings the so- called Slav Epic?

Müller’s new house sign is literally reaching out with hands, cast in bronze. But there is something peculiar about the shape of these hands. They are covered in an additional layer of material, rubber gloves, and thus the cast is showing an abstract shape rather than a realistic depiction of hands. These hands are open to suggestions, open to discussion, opinions and exchange of thoughts, but they also suggest power, possibly prepared to work or even fight. They are reaching out, but remain hesitant in light of an uncertain future.

Ute Müller was born 1978 in Graz, Austria.
She lives and works in Vienna, Austria. Ambivalence as a stance and impetus in seeking form and anti-form play a decisive role for Ute Müller: be it casts of negative forms of almost recognizable objects or arrangements of found, easy- to-change, and thus differently charged things. The artist makes comprehensible the process of formation; she varies materials and combines references without allowing anything specific to be missed when grappling with form, idea, and presentation. The categories of space and time are vital for the artist.

Müller studied Fine Arts at the University of Applied Arts Vienna and at the Royal College of Art London. Since 2009 she has been publishing the artist-zine editions Black Pages with Christoph Meier and Nick Oberthaler. Müller has shown amongst other venues at Künstlerhaus Graz, Établissement d‘en face Brussels, Kunsthalle Vienna, Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin, Museum for Applied Arts Vienna, Nomas Foundation Rome, Austrian Cultural Forum New York, 21er Haus Vienna, Pigna Project Space Rome, Kumho Museum Seoul and NJP Art Center Seoul.

www.utemueller.blackpages.at/utemueller.html

Antonis Pittas


Náměstí Franze Kafky
50°05'15.7"N 14°25'08.9"E
Monument composed of unused pedestals

Zenger Transformer Substation
Pod Bruskou 147/3, 118 00 Malá Strana
Facade of the building
50°05'32.7"N 14°24'33.9"E

A tower of various forgotten public memories, a text embedded into the skin of a future institution, who really cares?!

Who Cares; I will close my eyes and put my finger on the map, 2018


Antonis Pittas reactivates a forgotten or let’s say misplaced layer of memory in the public space, partially forgotten, partially constructed, by re-introducing a series of monumental historical pedestals of varying scale and character from the depository of the City Gallery of Prague, the institution responsible for the well-being of public monuments in the city. All selected pedestals were considered to be obsolete and without any future function. Pittas is piling them up to one single tower, named Who Cares. A phrase with dual meaning, either as a question in regards to a lack of interest or on the other hand an emphasis on individuals who really do care.

Whilst seemingly missing their original subject (for instance a national hero or a historical symbol of virtue) and raison d’être, on closer inspection, a single bulldog clip can be found on the surface. This subtle subversion effectively transforms the pedestals into a monolithic clipboard for public use, where visitors of the festival or someone passing by randomly, has the opportunity to attach a new layer of public memory for the following audience to reflect upon or remove or replace it with a new message, found material, a little story, an announcement about a missing pet and so on. Such could be the reaction of an attentive audience, on the other hand, a different kind of visitor of this site could just vandalize or totally ignore this open proposal for interaction. These anonymous, relation to their original context lacking, pedestals are being connected on one spot with their new function and narrative, and the histories are reformulated and made anew. No instructions or materials are accompanying the intervention as it is intended that their use (or lack of use) be determined with an intuitive engagement of the public.

Into this monumental clipboard, Pittas will introduce only one first statement, graphically connected with his other intervention into the fabric of the city center. A text-based work on the facade of the Zenger Transformer Substation on Klarov, a building, which will soon serve as a public institution, namely Kunsthalle Praha. Pittas will use the facade to present a single sentence as statement with multiple layers of reading. Alternating from a politically laden reading to a more poetic and open one, seemingly random but on point at the same time. Due to the high frequency of traffic in front of Zenger Substation and its location next to the main vein of touristic tours through Prague, this statement will automatically reach a wide range of readers to be interpreted and understood at their mercy.

Kunsthalle Praha is a new space for art and culture in the historical center of Prague. It will offer a dynamic range of art exhibitions, education programs, cultural events and social activities. Kunsthalle Praha‘s mission is to engage diverse audiences in a deeper understanding and appreciation of Czech and international art of the 20th and 21st century and to explore innovative ways of bringing art to the public. Kunsthalle Praha is a non-profit organization established by The Pudil Family Foundation. It is scheduled to open to visitors in 2020 after completion of the building’s reconstruction designed by Schindler Seko Architects.

Antonis Pittas was born1973, in Athens, Greece. He lives and works in Amsterdam.

Pittas mainly creates context-sensitive installations, characterized by a performative interaction between past political and artistic movements and the present. In each of his presentations, the artist looks for a dialogue in the gap between the artwork and the art space, whilst addressing the way historical (artistic) forms represent themselves in the contemporary context, sometimes in a violent manner. Next to his art practice, for the last five years Pittas has been a teacher at the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam, as well as a guest teacher at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen and at the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam. His work has been shown amongst others at Hordaland Kunstsenter, Bergen; Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam; Annet Gelink Gallery; Hessel Museum of Art & CSS Bard Galleries, Annandale, New York; Benaki Museum, Athens; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Centraal Museum, Utrecht; Kunsthal Extra City, Antwerp; Bozar, Brussels; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen.

www.antonispittas.info

Boris Ondreička


Stone Bell House, cellar
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město
Entrance from Týnská street

Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Installation & Performance

Negative mountaineering into a mediaeval cellar, into the Abyss, the bottomless pit, a spring of duality, a gap between unreal and real.

ABYSS, 2015-2018




Boris Ondreička was born in 1969. He lives and works in Bratislava, Slovakia and in Vienna, Austria.

“Theory is anxious about practice because practice is dirty. Practice (usefulness) is anxious about theory (truth) because theory is clean. Both dirty and clean are affected poses, manifestative postures, manipulative aesthetical, ethical, moral imperatives. Mind / self, life, world (nature, cosmos) are all filthy. There is an abyss between pampered theory and corrupted practice. The abyss is a bottomless pit. The abyss is a spring of duality. The abyss is a gap between unreal and real.”

Abyss as a long term project of Slovak artist and curator Boris Ondreička proves its urgency anew in its iteration for VICE VERSA. Abyss, previously manifested through a written essay resonating by its public proclamations and an found image archive finds a new embodiment in a complex and monumental diagram. A network of relations or a collective mind map with encyclopedic qualities mingles on the borderlines of a semi-conscious, semi-random Google search. The richness of thoughts and their sundry interpretations propose an open reading in the absence of the artist, when the monolithic placeholder of the diagram stays still and silent, waiting for the presence of its author to be animated by the flow of words, rhythms and tunes. Ondreička decides to take his audience on a metaphysical journey through a speculative history to comment and critically challenge the social and cultural status quo of our times, literally changing the climate of an experience, by asking the visitor to enter the dark medieval cellar of the Stone Bell House, evoking the feeling of stepping into an abyss, practicing negative mountaineering and becoming an antihero filled with anxiety.

Ondreička is a curator, artist, writer and singer. He has been working at Soros Centre for Contemporary Arts, Bratislava, as the director of the art-initiative tranzit.sk, Bratislava, Slovakia, and since 2012 curator at Thyssen- Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria. Where he has (co-)curated Rare Earth; Supper Club; Tomorrow Morning Line; Ephemeropteræ, Olafur Eliasson Green light. Amongst that he has co/curated Manifesta 8, Being The Future, Palast der Republik, Berlin, DE; Symposion at The Event, Birmingham, UK; Auditorium, Stage, Backstage, Frankfurter Kunstverein, DE; and many individual projects. In 2010 he co-founded the Július Koller Society.

His artistic practice evolves around questions of transfer or translation of meaning between a text and an image, defined by precise rhythm, timing, metrics, consistency and inner critique. He carves out the space of his work somewhere between areas of the private and the public.

His artistic projects include Manifesta 2, Venice Biennial; Prague-, Gyumri-, Torino-, Anzengruber-, Tai-Pei-, Athens- , Kyiv-, Jakarta- biennales; MoMA-PS1 NYC, USA; BAK Utrecht, NL; Maastricht, NL; W139 and De Appel, Amsterdam, NL; Smak, Gent, BE; Kunsthalle Loppem, BE; Marres, Tramway Glasgow UK, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Turin, IT; Le Plateau, and Galerie Jocelyn Wolff, both Paris, F; Frankfurter-, Kölnischer-, Badischer-, Münchener-, Stuttgarter Kunstvereins, DE; Kiasma, Helsinki, FI; HKW, Berlin, DE; ACAF, Alexandria, EG; Slovak and Czech national galleries; Secession, Mumok, Kunsthalle, Tanzquartier, all Vienna, AT; and elsewhere. His HI! lo. was published at tranzit / jrp Ringier, CH. Since 1987 is a lead-singer and lyrics writer of the band Kosa z nosa, Bratislava, SK.

Lisa Reitmeier


Municipal Authority of Prague 1
Vodičkova 681/18, Nové Měst
50°04'45.9"N 14°25'22.1"E
Three vitrines on the ground floor
Open: Mon–Thu, 8 AM – 6 PM, Fri 8 AM – 4 PM Installation and research material

Stone Bell House cellar
Entrance from Týnská street
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město,
Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Installation

A parallel map of the city inhabited by a mole-like creature exploring long forgotten theses of Neptunists and Plutonists. What lies beneath the surface unfolds in front of your very eyes.

Public Paranoia, 2018


Lisa Reitmeier creates a fictional narrative based on an assemblage of true events and literary stories related to the often neglected subterranean infrastructures of the city which finds its translation in a series of sculptures, installations and drawings appropriately displayed in the vitrines of the Municipal Authority of Prague 1 and in a more extended form in the cellar of the Stone Bell House.

From Goethe’s many visits to Karlsbad, where he worked on geological research while selling stones to the tourists that went there for cure, to Kafka’s metaphorical story “The Burrow”, Reitmeier brings to our attention ignored spaces and protagonists of urban lives lead in the underground.

Goethe was a so called Neptunist and believed a primordial lake to be the origin of all stones whereas the rivalling group of Plutonists was convinced that volcanoes created all geological elements.

The mole-like being of ‘The Burrow’ creates his life in an elaborate system of tunnels it has built over the course of its life - serving as a metaphor for the many passages and underground systems of Prague, be it the metro, historical catacombs or the vastest data cable network in Europe - which create almost a parallel pedestrian system - but also bigger issues of who owns the ground and what happens there, when we are used to often only look at the surface of the city. Even though it seems almost like a cliché to deal with Kafka when working in Prague - exactly this notion relates to what tourists very often come to see and what the city itself is exploiting as its cultural capital. Parallely, these hidden spaces of the public sphere not only stratify the geology and infrastructure of a city but also reflect parallel lines of social strata for instance providing temporary shelter for the homeless.

In Reitmeier’s installations different fields and notions from geology, architecture, fashion, collecting, psychoanalysis, surveillance and history converge and become a medium to observe, discover and rethink the city differently.

Lisa Reitmeier was born in 1984 in Trostberg, Germany. She lives and works in Munich, Germany.

Power systems and body structures, rituals and cruelty are the subjects of Lisa Reitmeiers work. Together with the human body, its integrity and its modification, these concepts create a constitution that questions to what extent the performativity of violence and ritual form the human psyche. Experimental clash of materials and an emergent working process lead to extensive installations resembling walkable psychograms (a mixture of crime scene, research laboratory, psychoanalysis and intimacy). This performance of materials reveals how the formation of the psyche destroys as well as recreates interpersonal space, leading to both trauma and healing.

Reitmeier graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and was an artist resident at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam from 2014-2016. Her work has been shown at Hospitality in Cologne, Rijksakademie Amsterdam, Kunstverein Diepenheim and EYE Museum Amsterdam amongst others.

www.lisareitmeier.com

Sofie Thorsen


Florentinum, courtyard
Na Florenci 15, Nové město
50°05'20.7"N 14°26'07.9"E
Ensemble of sculptures & video work

Zaha Hadid, medieval city walls, trash pits, wells and remnants of former 14th-century houses, shapes of history translated into sculptural vessels holding a fluid process of constant urban change.

Excavation, 2018


Next to the Masaryk train station right at the borders of the Prague city center and its historical demarcation by former heavy fortification, a new business district is being constructed, crowned by a large multi-functional structure designed by Zaha Hadid Architects. Before the actual construction, extensive archaeological research was concluded, unearthing remnants of houses from the 14th-century as well as 16th-century gardens full of historical artifacts of varying importance. “You can dig anywhere in Prague, and you will always find something valuable”, said the main archaeologist responsible for the excavation site. The city is layered in many strata, each period represented at a certain depth in the ground. Since it is needed to make space for the foundations and underground floors of the new buildings, every single evidence of history is being removed from the site, catalogued and preserved.

Sofie Thorsen, fascinated by the process of renewal of the city structure, decided to secure more than just individual artifacts, and literally conserve the character of the ground itself. Making large-scale casts of the pits spread across the excavation site, rendering homage to the spots where the construction took place and waste accumulated over the course of time. These pits, negative spaces, curved and amorphous speak with a strong sculptural language, allowing three time periods to meet in Sofie Thorsen’s objects and in her video work: long gone history represented by the excavation site, more recent times of the train station and the foreseeable future of the new business center. All these timelines are manifested in the decision to preserve something as ephemeral, as undefined yet outlined as holes in the ground - made centuries ago, reopened during the last couple of months and enclosed again, possibly for good.

Sofie Thorsen was born 1971 in Århus, Denmark. She lives and works in Vienna, Austria.

In her installations, films and works on paper, Sofie Thorsen deals with questions of space and architecture in urban space as well as the exhibition context itself. Whereas the starting point of her work is mostly research based or documentary, the images and materials that surface during the research are reworked and developed into abstract objects and images that constitute the final work.

A graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, she has shown her work internationally in numerous group and solo exhibitions. She held a teaching position at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna from 2005 to 2009. Her work has been shown among others at Kunstbüro, Mumok Kino, Krobath Galerie, Leopold Museum, MAK/ Vienna Biennial, 21er Haus, all in Vienna; Anhava Galerie, Helsinki; House of Arts České Budějovice, Kunsthaus Düsseldorf, Krobath Berlin; Austrian Cultural Forum, New York City; etc.

www.sofiethorsen.net

ARTISTS

Hynek Alt (*1976, CZ)


Klementinum, at the entrance to the public study of the national library
Mariánské nám. 5, Staré Město
Open: Mon–Sat, 9 AM – 7 PM
50°05'13.2"N 14°24'59.6"E
Real-time 3D render on screens located

Silently ticking clocks, seemingly clearly defining a field without place for error, at least until you start to challenge the given.

Untitled (Tower Clock), 2018


The synchronisation of time is something that we usually take for granted. Our beloved technological accessories independently switch from standard to Daylight Saving Time or from our native time zone to an unknown one without us even noticing until one day when the battery in our wristwatch (mostly worn for style-related reasons) runs out and we are briefly reminded of the artificiality as well as omnipresence of this system. Hynek Alt aims to mine the potential that lies in the small glitches, drifts and skews of the clock, born of technical imperfections - nuisance to a society enslaved to ever increasing productivity through optimisation it could just the same be the key to its emancipation.

Transferring the actual tower clock of Klementinum not only to the ground floor, right next to the public study room, but also into a real-time render, the concept of synchronised time as a social construct dictating our life and work balance is questioned and its futility and fragility further emphasised in a momentary image which is recreated over and over again.

The first recorded occasion of time synchronisation came with the introduction of railway time in England in 1840. It was a tool needed to avoid accidents, near misses and offer a valid timetable for passengers with different local times and conductors alike. As railway networks expanded, synchronised time was exported to other parts of the world and created new standard times influenced by geography, industrial developments and political governance.

Klementinum may have very well laid the cornerstone for this development. Every year it attracts legions of tourists, mostly for its famous baroque library and view from the astronomical tower, but it also has a rich history related to scientific research and academia, especially in the field of astronomy as it saw famous astronomers such as Johannes Kepler and Tycho Brahe go in and out, making it a centre for astronomical and later meteorological measurements. Apart from a vast collection of astronomical equipment there is one room, which was devoted to the precise determination of noon, the so-called Meridian Hall, where a ray of light traversing the wall and space hits a string stretched across the room at precisely 12 o’clock every day moving from left to right in the course of a year therefore simultaneously performing as a camera obscura.

Hynek Alt was born in 1976. He lives and works in Prague.

Shifting between photography, video, object and installation, he is concerned with forms of perception of the human in the current digital era and the navigation in between physical surroundings and constructed social systems. He uses generic objects and situations, analyses them and changes the way of their presentation, while questioning their purpose. He employs at times widely accessible and cheap technologies (photography, Xerox, offset) aiming at precision, specificity and thorough research while usually arriving at a very general outcome and at times high-tech methods (3D scanning, 3D rendering) to achieve the opposite. His work consists of either a combination of different elements or isolation of one from the other to create new tension and layers of possible reading while challenging their usual hierarchy.

Since 2017 he is head of the Studio of Photography and New Media at FAMU, Prague. From 2008-2016 Hynek Alt was head of the photography studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague, together with Aleksandra Vajd.

His work has been shown at Fotograf Gallery in Prague, House of Art, Česke Budějovice, Futura Gallery in Prague and Rudolfinum Prague, Škuc Gallery Ljubljana, Slovenia, Plato, Ostrava, National Gallery, Prague, <rotor>, Graz, Galerie Fait, Brno, Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo, Mumok, Vienna, Drdova Gallery Prague, among others.

Matyáš Chochola (*1986, CZ)


September 18, 6pm
Kozí plácek (intersection of Kozí and Haštalská streets)
Performance

The cathartic experience of a Mad-Max-like tour through the city - how far can you push the boundaries of a parking lot?

The Master of the Golden Cut, 2018


Chochola’s project for VICE VERSA uses the performative and participatory qualities of his oeuvre to pinpoint specific blind spots in the city’s legislation in regards to the private use of public spaces for entertainment purposes. Putting a spotlight on the idea of never-ending entertainment and joy of temporary visitors of Prague, he formulates an even stronger contrast of the already quite disparate lack of balance between lives of visitors and local residents. His idea is to orchestrate a migrating concert and a series of improvised performances all around the historical city, using means usually reserved for paying tourists and offer a cathartic experience to a widest possible audience of locals and visitors alike.

Cars and paid parking lots function as Chochola’s stage. Prague is full of very specific vehicles for sightseeing rides: horse carriages, old-timers, elongated 90s looking limousines with darkened windows and during certain occasions even huge jeeps equipped with additional speakers cruise the streets playing advertisements or military cars of some dubious interest groups, friends of military history or possibly film crews shooting a movie. Chochola rents or arranges through personal deals the use of such vehicles for his performance organized together with various musicians, jugglers and students of improvised theatre from the Academy of performative arts in Prague. Each car, “equipped” with a whole group of artists will drive through the city center, playing music, finding a suitable parking spot and presenting an unexpected street event.

It is important for Chochola to hold all that will be happening strictly legal, that means, driving and parking only on allowed designated areas, not stepping out of the car where such a gesture would change the status of the event to a regular street performance for which one needs a permit. His idea evolves around the exploration of the difference between public and private spaces in the city. When you drive your car with very loud music during the day, no one can interfere. When you park in an official parking spot and pay the fee, the spot is yours for those couple of minutes. Suddenly you “own” the space for your 15 minutes of fame. How far can you go in carving out a space for the unexpected while still abiding to the laws and regulations? How will the audience react? Will they think that they are witnessing just another tourist attraction or that there is something more to it? Will someone intervene or join the “band”? Let’s see how far the boundaries will be pushed.

Matyáš Chochola was born in 1986. He lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

He graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague and Universität der Künste in Berlin. He works primarily in the media of installation and performance. His body of work represents a richly composed universe whose integral part is constituted by the figure of the artist himself. Chochola experiments with post-internet aesthetics, an unorthodox yet sophisticated combination of the symbols of the present and its ancient roots. Trash objects meet precise glass-making techniques, spilled colour meets silk painting, the poetry of shamanism meets 90’s disco.

He has introduced his work, among others, at Manifesta 11 in Zurich, the Grimmuseum in Berlin, SVIT Gallery and the National Gallery in Prague. In 2012, Chochola received the Václav Chad Award at the 6th Zlín Youth Salon. In 2016 he received the Jindřich Chalupecký Award for his show Magic, Exotic, Erotic in the National Gallery in Prague.

www.matyaschochola.cz

Jasmina Cibic (*1979, SI)


National Museum
Vinohradská 1, Nové Město
Various locations in the building
Installation will be open from June 29 until the end of the festival.
Open: Mon–Sun, 10 AM – 6 PM except Wed, 9 AM – 6 PM;
every first Wednesday in a month 10 AM – 8 PM
50°04'47.8"N 14°25'54.2"E
Botanical illustrations

The former Federal Assembly, a collection of imaginary new rose variants representing the botanical hybrid between the rose Europa and roses named after the founding fathers of the European Union.

The Flower Effect, 2018


Jasmina Cibic’s new project materializes as a direct but unfinished dialogue between botany and ideological belonging, questioning their reciprocal influences in the formulation of the search for national and ideological symbols and their echoes in the present day.

Placed in Prague's former Federal Assembly, Cibic’s project finds a worthy host in the utopian architecture of Karel Prager finished in 1974, which later functioned as the headquarters of Radio Free Europe and currently serves as the temporary main building of the National Museum.

Within the former parliament building, The Flower Effect will present a number of illustrations Cibic created in collaboration with scientific botanical illustrators – showing a compositions of fictitious rose hybrids cross-pollinated between the Europa rose, (1928) and those bearing the names of the founding fathers of the European Union – an all-male politician cast, namely the Sir Winston Churchill Rose (1955); Konrad Adenauer Rose (1954), Jean Monnet Rose, (1988), Souvenir de Robert Schuman Rose® (1998), Mansholt Rose (1966), Victor Hugo® Rose (1985), Mazzini Rose (1925), Natali Rose (1981) and the Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt Rose (1933).

Up until the 19th century, rose hybridisation was a spontaneous occurrence, mediated by pollinating insects, or self-pollination. Controlled pollination of roses to create new varieties was first systematically practised by Empress Josephine's horticulturalist, Andre Dupont, when direct links between rose hybridisation, new rose varieties and systems of (inter)national power and diplomacy were established. These remain present today - most famously within spaces of national power such as the White House Rose Garden, which also gave the name to Rose Garden Strategy - furthering the contextual link between the scenographic spectacle of the roses, their names - and statecraft.

As symbols of sexualized and political desire throughout history, roses continue to be used to commemorate national belonging through allegories, names of countries and their politicians. Throughout the 20th century, one can clearly trace the upheavals of nationalisms and moments of awakening of national consciousness through specific times when naming new rose hybrids and naming them after notions and icons of national “treasures” is most prevalent.

Cibic’s project stems from the complete lack of female presence in the laying of foundations for the European Union – which is juxtaposed with the female allegory representing the very union of national states the founding fathers were creating: Europa herself. Similar to the new floral hybrids created by cross-pollination – they themselves are prone to chance and external conditions, announcing the fragility of new political unions and ideologies.

Jasmina Cibic was born 1979 in Ljubljana.

She works in film, sculpture, performance and installation to explore “soft power” – how political rhetoric is deployed through art and architecture, particularly examining how cultural production is used by the state to communicate certain principles and aspirations. Through unfolding the complex entanglements of art, gender and state power, the artist encourages viewers to consider the strategies employed in the construction of national culture. Her multi-layered approach draws together primary sources and interconnected narratives, creating shifting meanings and highlighting historical uncertainties and untruths.

Jasmina represented Slovenia at the 55th Venice Biennale. Her work was shown at BALTIC Gateshead, MSU Zagreb, MOCA Belgrade, MGLC Ljubljana, CCS BARD, Guangdong Museum of Art China, La Panacee Montpellier, MSUM Ljubljana and MNHA Luxembourg. Cibic’s films have been screened at FIAC Paris, HKW Berlin, Les Rencontres Internationales Paris and Copenhagen International Documentary Festival. In 2016 Jasmina Cibic has been nominated for the Jarman Award and was the winner of the MAC International Ulster Bank and Charlottenborg Fonden Awards.

Viktor Dedek (*1993, CZ)


June 11, 4pm
Courtyard, passageway between Spálená and Opatovická
50°04'46.4"N 14°25'07.4"E
Performance

A digital courtyard as a space between you and your screen, translated into the physical reality of the urban landscape.

Play Today - Courtyard Ludology, 2018


Our era of massive democratization of the omnipresent digital realm is radically redefining the perception of public space per se. We still behave as we have been for millennia, moving through natural or urban landscapes, interacting with our environment and dividing its roles and functions. Yet the widespread digital interfaces are allowing us to immerse ourselves more and more into a parallel space, one that creates a fully virtual experience and reality, scrolling through endless streams of Instagram posts, or managing your emails while walking. Viktor Dedek is focusing on one specific field of digital imagination: the gaming industry, perceived as a cross generational entertainment.

Dedek decides to merge the layers of two planes of existence, the real cityscape with character and specific rules of various computer games. Bringing the experience of gaming from the screen to the streets. The result of such an attempt resonates on the margins of performance, writing, theatre and sculptural practice. A series of events will take place throughout the duration of the festival, uncovering one by one a specific narrative, similarly to when you are watching a TV show.

As with most of the games, a certain level of linearity, no matter how strongly interrupted, is involved and thus each event shares a starting point, which will most likely also serve also as a destination. As this point of departure, Dedek selects a hidden courtyard, functioning as a passageway in between two streets. For Dedek the courtyard symbolizes a pre-digital past, a place where kids played their own games before they moved to protected zones of mental courtyards, spaces between them and their screens.

Each event will produce a sculptural trace, and a piece of writing presented in the form of a newspaper. Both media, once again, referencing the pre-digital past and their contrast to our here and now.

Viktor Dedek was born in 1993. He lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

Dedek is a student of the sculpture studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design. His practice evolves around precise strategies of the semiotic analysis by means of the sculptural medium. His recent interest in theatre and performance functions as an enhancement to his previous installation work and synthesises a certain sense of romantic poetics with pragmatic conceptualism.

He has shown his work at Galerie Jelení in Prague and participated in a series of group shows, for instance at Prague City Gallery, House of Arts in Brno and the gallery of Academy of Fine Arts in Prague.


Deniz Eroglu (*1981, DK)


Stone Bell House, Cellar
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město
Entrance from Týnská street
Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Film work

An unexpected turn of your vacation, instead of a medieval city you find yourself in the Turkish highlands. Are you even allowed to be here?

A Vacation, 2018


Often our ways of travelling are rather reckless, our clumsy attempts to experience a culture is increasing ignorance or resulting in damage and at times our naive wishes to broaden our worldview provoke the exact opposite, reinforcing feelings of superiority and privilege.

Abducting us into a cinematographic world of serene imagery and soothing landscapes we accompany a solitary traveller into the calm of the Turkish highlands. A very different kind of vacation than the one we can witness or experience in the city centre of Prague ensues, not only providing us with stark contrast in order to question growing tendencies to consume cheap, fast and superficial city trips but also addressing questions of lacking freedom of speech, possibilities of criticism and subversive alternatives to protest.

The swift change from the crowded streets of the city center into the cool and quiet cellar are partially intended as a break from the tourist frenzy close by, but we can only lay back and relax briefly, as we realise that underneath the alluring cinematic experience a story of personal protest unfolds, reminding us that the possibility to speak out depends very much on the geo-political context, same as our rights to travel and cross borders - one can be barred from entering a country for uttering unpleasant comments on Facebook, people are being held or imprisoned on pure suspicion with no formal charges - and not only in Turkey, where our lone anti-hero operates, but in many parts of Europe where we are facing transgressions and regression to laws that go against human connection or trust and climates of fear and anxiety are instigated and kept alive to support right-wing agitators by imposing censorship, control and violence into people's lives and privacy.

Deniz Eroglu was born 1981 in Denmark. He lives and works in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

While over the last years Deniz Eroglu’s practice has gradually opened up to other formats besides video and film encompassing different media such as sculptures, installations and text his source material has been narrowed down to the artist’s ancestry, history and personal biography. Eroglu has long exhibited a strong interest in characters that inhabit the margins of society and are in some way vulnerable or subject to persecution; be it melancholic hermits, bedridden patients or emaciated peasants, to name a few examples. The main themes being vulnerability and displacement within his own personal context.

Deniz Eroglu graduated from Städelschule in 2014. He was a resident artist at the Rijksakademie from 2016-17. His work has been shown amongst others at MMK, Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden, the Marrakech Biennial and Kunsthalle Krems.

www.denizeroglu.net

Feld72


Klárov, the park under the Old Castle Stairs
Malá Strana
50°05'31.0"N 14°24'32.4"E
Information panel

Proposals for the festival m3 / Art in space/ Kunsthalle Praha


Viennese architectural studio feld72 worked closely with the curatorial team of VICE VERSA and Kunsthalle Praha on the development of a new site-responsive structure, fulfilling a double role: firstly as a sculptural form, secondly as a pavilion for VICE VERSA providing a wide range of social activities to vivify the area right under the stairs leading to the Prague Castle, neighbouring with the Waldstein Riding School on one side and the future Kunsthalle Praha on the other. For a long time this particular piece of greenery was missing for any specific purpose, it’s too noisy due to closeness to the busy road and it’s quite hidden, being located slightly below the street level. Basically it doesn’t serve as a public park, rather as a passageway from A to B.

Such conditions were ideal for feld72 to make an attempt to redevelop the park and give it a new identity. The first monumental proposal was referencing surrounding walls, creating a new one with a multiplicity of functions, as an outdoors exhibition space, a cafe as well as a place for screenings, lectures and discussions. Giving its visitors an opportunity to experience a different view, both literally and metaphorically and to re-evaluate their relationship to the park. Due to variable and case-specific regulations in regards of the usage of public space and green areas, it was not possible to implement this version. The second proposal approached the area in a more mobile and transformative way. Bringing two separate movable architectural modules to the park and proposing similar functions as the first one, but in a more compact and portable fashion. Kunsthalle Praha plans to realise the project after their official opening at 2020.

The curatorial teams of VICE VERSA and Kunsthalle Praha, together with feld72, eventually decided to give space to these so far unrealised projects in the form of a presentation of sketches, drawings and references to allow our visitors to imagine the possible potential of these pavilions. As a placeholder for these projects an adapted fragment of an older work of feld72 realized in 2016 in the Viennese Hofburg was selected to serve as a small-scale temporary architecture exhibition. Unrealized projects and even their representation and circulation have a long tradition in the field of architecture, as it is not only a profession subjected to a questionable system of excessive unpaid labour, mostly in competitions, but also complex and fragile project structures that often fail to endure as well as a widespread disregard and ignorance in relation to outlay and complexity of architectural labour.

Now, on your way to the Prague Castle or maybe just during a slight detour from the nearby subway stop you can enjoy at least the vision of a potential transformation, accompanied by a sculptural map of Prague 1, area hosting all of VICE VERSA projects.

The work of feld72 pivots on the interface of architecture, applied urbanism and art. feld72 has implemented numerous projects of various dimensions in the national and international context, a huge range including master plans, buildings, studies on urban development, interior and exhibition design, urban strategies and large-scale interventions in the urban environment. The multiple award-winning works are remarkable for a socially responsible, innovative and sustainable approach to architecture and urbanism. Tracking down and reinforcing the potential in locations and (social) environments is a fundamental element of feld72 projects. Expanding the field of architecture within the context of the self-initiated project series “Urban Strategies”, the collective has been engaged ever since the office was founded in 2002 in Vienna in tackling the issues of the use and perception of the public space. Through numerous teaching assignments at universities the approach and methodology of feld72 have been integrated into the academic discourse.

Liam Gillick (*1964, UK)


Poster campaign throughout the city, festival homepage, spots in Aerofilms Cinemas

A visual identity for the Flat Earth Society and the sound of cheerful jingles leading us all to the Underground.

Flatter Earthed, 2018
A message from Miltiades, 2018
Fragment d’histoire future 1-3, 2018


Liam Gillick’s role for VICE VERSA could be described in various ways, as a critical commentator referencing current political and cultural climate, as an outside witness to the institutional functioning of the city of Prague and the festival itself, or as a formative agent for the creation of a visual identity of the festival.

Gillick conceived the main visual identifier of the festival, describable as its logo. Three parallel rings holding a name of the festival and its current title, suggesting a system of planetary rings missing the actual central body. It could be also read as a plain two-dimensional surface, referring to the recently medially present group of “Flat Earthers” - from the so-called Flat Earth Society, an organization promoting the assumption that our planet is one flat surface, rather than a sphere. At times, when the term post-truth spread from the academic discourse to the terminology of the general public, Gillick is using an example of “flat earthers” to directly refer to our lost ability to follow unified narratives.

The logo itself is accompanied by series of sound pieces - jingles if you will - presented on the festival’s home page, and in cinema spots distributed through Aerofilms.

The final layer of Gillick’s participation evolves from an older work named Underground (Fragments of Future Histories), an exhibition project and publication appropriating and adapting a 19th-century dystopian novel by Gabriel Tarde of the same name. Gillick selected a series of quotes from the novel, or rather from its script adaptation he created to address issues of precarious artistic production, policies of the city in regards to art in public space and the understanding, appreciation or a lack of interest from the general public.

Liam Gillick was born in 1964. He lives and works in New York, United States.

Gillick deploys multiple forms to expose the new ideological control systems that emerged at the beginning of the 1990s. He has developed a number of key narratives that often form the engine for a body of work. Gillick’s work exposes the dysfunctional aspects of a modernist legacy in terms of abstraction and architecture when framed within a globalized, neo-liberal consensus.

His work has been included in numerous important exhibitions including documenta and the Venice, Berlin and Istanbul Biennales - representing Germany in 2009 in Venice. Solo museum exhibitions have taken place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and Tate in London. Over the last twenty five years, Gillick has also been a prolific writer and critic of contemporary art – contributing to Artforum, October, Frieze and e-flux Journal. He is the author of a number of books including a volume of his selected critical writing. High profile public works include the British Government Home Office (Interior Ministry) building in London and the Lufthansa Headquarters in Frankfurt. Throughout this time Gillick has extended his practice into experimental venues and collaborative projects with artists including Philippe Parreno, Lawrence Weiner and Louise Lawler.

www.liamgillick.info

Anna Hulačová (*1984, CZ)


Karlovo nám. 13, Nové Město
Entrance to the subway
50°04'33.8"N 14°25'08.3"E
Installation

Enlarged visitors from a micro environment, overcoming boundaries of time and space, manifesting themselves in a style referencing social civilism of the 1920s.

The Touches of Gods and Other Zooms, 2018


Anna Hulačová is slightly stepping out of the territory pinned down for VICE VERSA. She’s crossing the demarcation line of Prague 1 into Prague 2, still only a couple of hundreds of meters from the demarcated area. She is also fiercely zooming in, leaving our sensually perceivable environment and entering a micro world of bacteria and unicellular organisms, which she’s enlarging into a visually apprehensible scale. On top of it all, her intention plays with the various paces of travel through an urban fabric of the city, while placing her works next to the entrance or exit of the subway. As if she would like to compare the time spent walking on the surface and moving in an accelerated fashion under the ground by means of the public transportation system. In this respect, her work already starts in the heart of the city centre, at a nearby station on the B line, crossing just one stop, re-appearing on the surface and giving us a chance of actually seeing and experiencing her physical work. Like ancient gods travelled at a supernatural pace across the world as they pleased, or like the Christian God is allegedly omnipresent at all places at once. Those are Hulačová’s Touches of Gods. Same as the power illustrated in the decision to completely change the scales of living organisms, a method known rather from Hollywood film production, for instance think of the first silver screen appearance of King Kong in 1933, the Ant-Man in the latest Marvel addition to an endless line of superheroes, or any enlarged creature entering with its new dimensions not only a new realm of existence, but also of perception and emotion, and not necessarily fear of a threatening Other invading our world, as it could just the same be a friendly visit, from one plane to the other.

Hulačová’s typical references to the style of social civilism of the 1920s gives The Touches of Gods and Other Zooms its aesthetic character as well as a relationship to the history of art in public space from the period of modernism, merging with the specific style of the 1970s, when this particular subway entrance was designed.

The time, the space, the scale and our human perception are in flux, as if they were loosing any boundaries and allowing us to perceive their unending diversity at the same time, granted for a moment by the Touch of Gods. Hulačová is offering this shifted reading and understanding of a city as an organism in constant transformation, suggesting importance of subjective perception, which has a power to redefine the seemingly stable and given reality.

Anna Hulačová was born 1984 in Sušice. She lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic.

Hulačová's practice evolves around sculptures which revive traditional crafts, translating the inspiration found in ancient mythologies, eastern cultures as well as in Czech folk traditions and original Christian symbolism into the language of contemporary art.

She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague and was nominated for the Jindřich Chalupecký Award in 2016. Her work has been shown amongst others at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Meyer-Riegger in Berlin, Z20 Sara Zanin in Rome, Contemporary Art Centre in Vilnius and National Gallery in Prague.

Christian Jankowski (*1968, DE)


June 8, 10pm
June 9, 11am
Nám. Jana Palacha
Performance

The artist is present, dreaming, washing, drying, playing.

Leaving No Marks/ Playing Spree to Moldau, 2018


Jankowski is consciously coming to Prague as a visitor, or rather a visiting artist bearing gifts. A one-night and one-day long performance exposes the artist as a short-term traveller, coming for a brief moment to deal with his “business” and leave right afterwards. Spending the night in a selected hotel in the city center of Prague, Jankowski may or may not dream about his task at hand, but as it is with dreams, their outcome or mere occurrence is hard to predict. Nevertheless, the idea of sleeping, dreaming, sweating will leave an imprint in the hotel room and most intimately on the hotel bed sheets, which Jankowski will bring to a local laundromat to wash and remove all the marks of his bodily presence. Later on, he will leave the sheets to dry on the sculpture of Czech 19th-century painter Josef Mánes on the river bank of Vltava, situated between the Art Academy and Rudolfinum, Kunsthalle and seat of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, waiting patiently during the process under the sculpture itself, open to a discussion with passers-by departing from the idea of Leaving No Marks.

Jankowski is addressing the idea of constant jet-set of internationally acclaimed artists, as he himself represents, coming to places without much of a context to produce work on the basis of limited knowledge and leave, only oiling the machinery of global art scene exchange and its market. Besides the critical aspect of the work, Jankowski also opens up the topic of usage of representational parts of the city center for traditional household labour, changing a sculpture of canonical national artist to a clothes drying rack.

In the second part of his day, Jankowski will shift his focus from the urban structure of the city and its character to natural forces predating the city itself, specifically the river Vltava (Moldau in German) in a work called Playing Spree to Moldau and Vice Versa. With a set-up for a DJ session on the river bank of Vltava, Jankowski will play pre-recorded sounds of Berlin’s river Spree to the Vltava. Focusing on the significance of Vltava for Czech history and legends, taking into account the role of Bedřich Smetana’s symphony Má Vlast and its most notoriously known part named after the river. Upon his arrival back home to Berlin, Jankowski will swap roles, and present the sounds of Moldau to Spree. With this simple and poetic gesture, Jankowski connects the two poles of his voyage from Berlin to Prague, serenading two bodies of water which flow into Labe (Elbe) and exit the European mainland into the North Sea.

Christian Jankowski was born in 1968. He lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

By utilising the medium of human relationships, the comedic slapstick humour of Formulae, or indeed any of the other innumerable tools of modern communication available, Christian Jankowski trades blows with history, politics and the language of art. His works are almost always performances - both literally and figuratively - in so far as his carefully calibrated set-ups and interactive scenarios engage occasionally unsuspecting collaborators: televangelists, fortune tellers, border guards and professional magicians have all innocently colluded with him to become co-authors of his wide-ranging work.

Jankowski studied at the Academy of Fine Arts, Hamburg, Germany. Recent solo exhibitions include Kunsthaus Hamburg, Germany, Center for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw, Poland; Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros, Mexico City, Mexico; MACRO, Rome, Italy; Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany; Miami Art Museum, Florida, USA; MIT List Visual Art Center, Massachusetts, Cambridge, USA; Swiss Institute, New York, USA and the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, USA. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions “When I Give, I Give Myself”, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Project Los Altos (off-site show in Silicon Valley, staged by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, USA; Taipei Biennial, Taiwan; Sydney Biennial, Australia; the Whitney Biennial, New York, NY, USA and the Venice Biennale. In 2016, Jankowski curated the 11th edition of Manifesta, becoming the first artist to assume the role.

Barbara Kapusta (*1983, AT)


Theatre and Café NONA
Národní 4, Nové Město
Open: Mon–Fri, 9 AM – 12 AM,
Sat–Sun, 11 AM – 1 2AM
Holidays: July 10th – August 20th
50°04'52.5"N 14°24'52.7"E
Installation in the staircase

We demand to be public and exposed but not attacked/ we demand to be in public, seen, but private…
A silent play of four actors, transmitting their messages layered on precious marble.

We Make the Place by Playing, 2018


Barbara Kapusta invites us into a hybrid environment where culture and the commercial intersect and offer a space that is neither really public nor really private: the theatre and café NONA. It is its nature to not only to host theatre goers but a wider public in an extended system of hallways, entrees, sitting corners and toilets offering possibilities of rest, recreation and chit-chat.

Against this background Kapusta stages a play of her own, set in a fictional time and place, where public space has become massively privatized, controlled and policed. The four main protagonists Player, Speaker, Pointer and Sleeper take shape as ceramic sculptures and spread out over the venue. They initiate a difficult conversation about basic rights, strategies to reclaim public space, loitering, resting and playing that we can witness and interact with as a wall-text where the body has literally become the bearer of the message.

Barbara Kapusta was born in 1983. She lives and works in Vienna.

Kapusta's work almost exclusively departs from poetry and from there evolves into performance, film, sculpture or storytelling. She explores the relationship between the material nature of things and the physical existence of the observer as well as verbal and non-verbal language employed in this particular exchange of animate and inanimate participants.

Her objects, films and text-based works have recently been shown at, among others, Gianni Manhattan Vienna, KUP Athens, 21er Haus Vienna, Kunsthalle Vienna, Scriptings Berlin, Beautiful Gallery in Chicago and mumok cinema in Vienna.

www.barbarakapusta.net

David Maljković (*1973, HR)


Hotel Elysee, rooftop
Václavské nám. 43, Nové Město
50°04'52.8"N 14°25'41.7"E

Neon sign on the rooftop, best visibility between 7pm and 7am

A legacy of advertisement from the era of the modernist project, piercing through the current state of visual pollution of the city.

Dead Ad, 2018


The project of David Maljković for m3 Festival is smoothly sliding through his familiar tracks of excavation of historical links, formative for our present conditions. During his research trip to Prague, Maljković ventured into a variety of possible conceptual directions for his contribution but lastly decided to focus on the relation between the visual legacy of advertising from the times of the modernist project in relation to the current state of promotional pollution of the city. Since the only stable bearer of advertisement is architecture, while all the temporary structures are being frequently exchanged, Maljković was looking for modernistic houses which were since their inception used as placeholders of advertisement since the beginning.

After many considerations, a house in the upper part of Wenceslas Square was selected. A modernist house currently accommodating Hotel Elysee, right next to its style successor, the famous social realistic Hotel Jalta that was finished in the late 1950s. The rooftop of Hotel Elysee bears an empty and strangely anonymous metal construction, ready for a new advertisement, yet unused in the long term. Maljković decided to manifest his ideas through an installation made out of neon light tubes, animating that abandoned rooftop structure. Referencing old advertisement without clear quotation or reconstruction, but by manipulating and distorting and the idea of unpreserved historical material. The language of Dead Ad stays abstract and anonymous, as its placeholder itself. Enlightening a highly frequented central location in the city, staying invisible or being overlooked in its visually oversaturated context, or possibly creating a new beacon.

David Maljković was born 1973 in Rijeka, Croatia. He lives and works in Zagreb, Croatia.

His practice engages with the malleable relationship between form and content in aesthetic terms, or signifier and signified in linguistic terms. It is within this relationship that Maljković negotiates his formal methods and disjunctive intentions, discussing topics such as formalism of failed utopias.

After studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, David Maljković participated in several artist's residency programs including the one of the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. His work has been shown at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Secession Vienna, Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid, Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, 11th Gwangju Biennale and the 56. Biennale di Venezia, among others.

Christoph Meier (*1980, AT)


Church of Our Lady of the Snows x Austrian Cultural Forum, Courtyard
Jungmannovo nám. 18, Nové Město
50°04'58.5"N 14°25'22.3"E
Installation in the courtyard, composed of crowd control barriers

A crowd control mechanism with a mysterious purpose or unintelligible meaning, spreading as a modular structure, testing the qualities of the given space.

Untitled, 2018


In an attempt to not only activate areas in the public space in its traditional sense, but also address relationships between the outside and inside of the public space and institutions and their different gradients of privacy and publicity Meier counts on our preconditioned reading of ready-made guiding systems as a familiar structure.

Christoph Meier was born in 1980 in Vienna, Austria, where he lives and works.

By placing a series of crowd control barriers Meier imitates situations we very well know from airports, ticket counters or nightclubs and applies them to what is supposed to be an open public space. Playing with this ready-made guiding system, Meier draws attention to the use and misuse of the public space, yet remains mysterious in regards of the actual purpose or function of the barriers themselves as they seem to serve an event or institution that has yet failed to manifest itself rather pointing our attention to their inherent qualities prompting specific behaviour, relational hierarchies and distributing status between those in- and outside.

Meier’s intervention manifests itself in a modular structure, which in theory is adaptable to different scales and situations. One of the main interests of Meier’s practice could have its origin in the architecture of Adolf Loos, specifically Loos’s ability to transform spatially limited environments into networks of mirroring and spreading illusionary additions to existing architectural structures - the best example being the Viennese American Bar. His ongoing long term project is based on the idea of the construction of space-consuming ever-multiplying structures which penetrate various exhibition venues, without any apparent respect to their natural settings, copying a specific grid and thus testing qualities of the given space. In basic terms, he’s interested in the negotiation of overlapping grids, which delineate the void and in return become concept and content of his oeuvre.

Christoph Meier’s work considers the artistic intervention as a frame for social exchange, often alluding to mundane and popular spaces for interaction, such as the bar. Resorting to architectural strategies, such as the grid i.e. he reveals previously not visible conditions of the surrounding space, usually in a nonchalant and abstract way, where content and frame merge to accentuate the void. A void to be filled or reflected upon by the viewer.

Meier graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and received the MAK Schindler Scholarship. His work has been shown at Casino Luxembourg, KIOSK Ghent, Kunstverein Hamburg, French Pavilion in Zagreb and Kunsthaus Graz, amongst others.

www.christophmeier.net

Ute Müller (*1978, AT)


Ute Müller


RSJ
Revoluční 30, Nové Město
On the back wall, facing the river, covered in ivy
50°05'33.1"N 14°25'39.3"E
Installation

A series of hands reaching out into a plane of merging national history and visions of future possibilities blinded by a mist of contradicting interests.

Untitled, 2018


Before the introduction of modern house numbers in 1770 a much more visual and sensual system, consisting of objects, animals and symbols was used to designate some particularly important or meaningful houses. Until then these signs were the only orientation device to locate a specific building. We can still find some such signs and people who still relate to them, even if in a more anecdotal and emotional way. The building of RSJ belongs to a broadly popular eclectic historical style of the 19th century, therefore it doesn’t have any sign of this sort on it’s facade, even though in reference to past times, even in the 19th century, many owners were adding their new signs according to this ancient tradition and so does Müller. Her interest in this particular building comes from its specific context: firstly, it is a highly frequented location, both in a historical and contemporary sense, it is close to the river, facing Letná park, thus functioning as an observation point of history with a view from the left to the Hanavský pavilion from the General Land Centennial Exhibition in 1891, then to a remnant of a former monument to the Stalinist era, and last but not least, a symbol of the re-defined route to modernism through the Czechoslovak presentation at the EXPO58 and its restaurant pavilion. It feels as if the whole modern historical narrative of the country is accounted for from this one specific point of view - a story of political and cultural changes. Secondly Müller choses this building, because of its future fate. Being in the battlefield of a highly political discussion about a possible redevelopment among contradicting and conflicting interests. Will the renowned architect Eva Jiřičná be allowed to design a new building at this spot? Will the Prague City Gallery use this spot for a sculpture of Richard Deacon? Will Alphonse Mucha finally get his long awaited pavilion for the famous series of paintings the so- called Slav Epic?

Müller’s new house sign is literally reaching out with hands, cast in bronze. But there is something peculiar about the shape of these hands. They are covered in an additional layer of material, rubber gloves, and thus the cast is showing an abstract shape rather than a realistic depiction of hands. These hands are open to suggestions, open to discussion, opinions and exchange of thoughts, but they also suggest power, possibly prepared to work or even fight. They are reaching out, but remain hesitant in light of an uncertain future.

Ute Müller was born 1978 in Graz, Austria.
She lives and works in Vienna, Austria. Ambivalence as a stance and impetus in seeking form and anti-form play a decisive role for Ute Müller: be it casts of negative forms of almost recognizable objects or arrangements of found, easy- to-change, and thus differently charged things. The artist makes comprehensible the process of formation; she varies materials and combines references without allowing anything specific to be missed when grappling with form, idea, and presentation. The categories of space and time are vital for the artist.

Müller studied Fine Arts at the University of Applied Arts Vienna and at the Royal College of Art London. Since 2009 she has been publishing the artist-zine editions Black Pages with Christoph Meier and Nick Oberthaler. Müller has shown amongst other venues at Künstlerhaus Graz, Établissement d‘en face Brussels, Kunsthalle Vienna, Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin, Museum for Applied Arts Vienna, Nomas Foundation Rome, Austrian Cultural Forum New York, 21er Haus Vienna, Pigna Project Space Rome, Kumho Museum Seoul and NJP Art Center Seoul.

www.utemueller.blackpages.at/utemueller.html

Antonis Pittas (*1973, GR)



Náměstí Franze Kafky
50°05'15.7"N 14°25'08.9"E
Monument composed of unused pedestals

Zenger Transformer Substation
Pod Bruskou 147/3, 118 00 Malá Strana
Facade of the building
50°05'32.7"N 14°24'33.9"E

A tower of various forgotten public memories, a text embedded into the skin of a future institution, who really cares?!

Who Cares; I will close my eyes and put my finger on the map, 2018


Antonis Pittas reactivates a forgotten or let’s say misplaced layer of memory in the public space, partially forgotten, partially constructed, by re-introducing a series of monumental historical pedestals of varying scale and character from the depository of the City Gallery of Prague, the institution responsible for the well-being of public monuments in the city. All selected pedestals were considered to be obsolete and without any future function. Pittas is piling them up to one single tower, named Who Cares. A phrase with dual meaning, either as a question in regards to a lack of interest or on the other hand an emphasis on individuals who really do care.

Whilst seemingly missing their original subject (for instance a national hero or a historical symbol of virtue) and raison d’être, on closer inspection, a single bulldog clip can be found on the surface. This subtle subversion effectively transforms the pedestals into a monolithic clipboard for public use, where visitors of the festival or someone passing by randomly, has the opportunity to attach a new layer of public memory for the following audience to reflect upon or remove or replace it with a new message, found material, a little story, an announcement about a missing pet and so on. Such could be the reaction of an attentive audience, on the other hand, a different kind of visitor of this site could just vandalize or totally ignore this open proposal for interaction. These anonymous, relation to their original context lacking, pedestals are being connected on one spot with their new function and narrative, and the histories are reformulated and made anew. No instructions or materials are accompanying the intervention as it is intended that their use (or lack of use) be determined with an intuitive engagement of the public.

Into this monumental clipboard, Pittas will introduce only one first statement, graphically connected with his other intervention into the fabric of the city center. A text-based work on the facade of the Zenger Transformer Substation on Klarov, a building, which will soon serve as a public institution, namely Kunsthalle Praha. Pittas will use the facade to present a single sentence as statement with multiple layers of reading. Alternating from a politically laden reading to a more poetic and open one, seemingly random but on point at the same time. Due to the high frequency of traffic in front of Zenger Substation and its location next to the main vein of touristic tours through Prague, this statement will automatically reach a wide range of readers to be interpreted and understood at their mercy.

Kunsthalle Praha is a new space for art and culture in the historical center of Prague. It will offer a dynamic range of art exhibitions, education programs, cultural events and social activities. Kunsthalle Praha‘s mission is to engage diverse audiences in a deeper understanding and appreciation of Czech and international art of the 20th and 21st century and to explore innovative ways of bringing art to the public. Kunsthalle Praha is a non-profit organization established by The Pudil Family Foundation. It is scheduled to open to visitors in 2020 after completion of the building’s reconstruction designed by Schindler Seko Architects.

Antonis Pittas was born1973, in Athens, Greece. He lives and works in Amsterdam.

Pittas mainly creates context-sensitive installations, characterized by a performative interaction between past political and artistic movements and the present. In each of his presentations, the artist looks for a dialogue in the gap between the artwork and the art space, whilst addressing the way historical (artistic) forms represent themselves in the contemporary context, sometimes in a violent manner. Next to his art practice, for the last five years Pittas has been a teacher at the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam, as well as a guest teacher at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen and at the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam. His work has been shown amongst others at Hordaland Kunstsenter, Bergen; Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam; Annet Gelink Gallery; Hessel Museum of Art & CSS Bard Galleries, Annandale, New York; Benaki Museum, Athens; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Centraal Museum, Utrecht; Kunsthal Extra City, Antwerp; Bozar, Brussels; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen.

www.antonispittas.info

Boris Ondreička (*1969, SK)


Stone Bell House, cellar
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město
Entrance from Týnská street

Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Installation & Performance

Negative mountaineering into a mediaeval cellar, into the Abyss, the bottomless pit, a spring of duality, a gap between unreal and real.

ABYSS, 2015-2018




Boris Ondreička was born in 1969. He lives and works in Bratislava, Slovakia and in Vienna, Austria.

“Theory is anxious about practice because practice is dirty. Practice (usefulness) is anxious about theory (truth) because theory is clean. Both dirty and clean are affected poses, manifestative postures, manipulative aesthetical, ethical, moral imperatives. Mind / self, life, world (nature, cosmos) are all filthy. There is an abyss between pampered theory and corrupted practice. The abyss is a bottomless pit. The abyss is a spring of duality. The abyss is a gap between unreal and real.”

Abyss as a long term project of Slovak artist and curator Boris Ondreička proves its urgency anew in its iteration for VICE VERSA. Abyss, previously manifested through a written essay resonating by its public proclamations and an found image archive finds a new embodiment in a complex and monumental diagram. A network of relations or a collective mind map with encyclopedic qualities mingles on the borderlines of a semi-conscious, semi-random Google search. The richness of thoughts and their sundry interpretations propose an open reading in the absence of the artist, when the monolithic placeholder of the diagram stays still and silent, waiting for the presence of its author to be animated by the flow of words, rhythms and tunes. Ondreička decides to take his audience on a metaphysical journey through a speculative history to comment and critically challenge the social and cultural status quo of our times, literally changing the climate of an experience, by asking the visitor to enter the dark medieval cellar of the Stone Bell House, evoking the feeling of stepping into an abyss, practicing negative mountaineering and becoming an antihero filled with anxiety.

Ondreička is a curator, artist, writer and singer. He has been working at Soros Centre for Contemporary Arts, Bratislava, as the director of the art-initiative tranzit.sk, Bratislava, Slovakia, and since 2012 curator at Thyssen- Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria. Where he has (co-)curated Rare Earth; Supper Club; Tomorrow Morning Line; Ephemeropteræ, Olafur Eliasson Green light. Amongst that he has co/curated Manifesta 8, Being The Future, Palast der Republik, Berlin, DE; Symposion at The Event, Birmingham, UK; Auditorium, Stage, Backstage, Frankfurter Kunstverein, DE; and many individual projects. In 2010 he co-founded the Július Koller Society.

His artistic practice evolves around questions of transfer or translation of meaning between a text and an image, defined by precise rhythm, timing, metrics, consistency and inner critique. He carves out the space of his work somewhere between areas of the private and the public.

His artistic projects include Manifesta 2, Venice Biennial; Prague-, Gyumri-, Torino-, Anzengruber-, Tai-Pei-, Athens- , Kyiv-, Jakarta- biennales; MoMA-PS1 NYC, USA; BAK Utrecht, NL; Maastricht, NL; W139 and De Appel, Amsterdam, NL; Smak, Gent, BE; Kunsthalle Loppem, BE; Marres, Tramway Glasgow UK, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Turin, IT; Le Plateau, and Galerie Jocelyn Wolff, both Paris, F; Frankfurter-, Kölnischer-, Badischer-, Münchener-, Stuttgarter Kunstvereins, DE; Kiasma, Helsinki, FI; HKW, Berlin, DE; ACAF, Alexandria, EG; Slovak and Czech national galleries; Secession, Mumok, Kunsthalle, Tanzquartier, all Vienna, AT; and elsewhere. His HI! lo. was published at tranzit / jrp Ringier, CH. Since 1987 is a lead-singer and lyrics writer of the band Kosa z nosa, Bratislava, SK.

Lisa Reitmeier (*1984, DE)



Municipal Authority of Prague 1
Vodičkova 681/18, Nové Měst
50°04'45.9"N 14°25'22.1"E
Three vitrines on the ground floor
Open: Mon–Thu, 8 AM – 6 PM, Fri 8 AM – 4 PM Installation and research material

Stone Bell House cellar
Entrance from Týnská street
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město,
Open: Tue–Sun, 2 PM – 8 PM
50°05'15.9"N 14°25'19.2"E
Installation

A parallel map of the city inhabited by a mole-like creature exploring long forgotten theses of Neptunists and Plutonists. What lies beneath the surface unfolds in front of your very eyes.

Public Paranoia, 2018


Lisa Reitmeier creates a fictional narrative based on an assemblage of true events and literary stories related to the often neglected subterranean infrastructures of the city which finds its translation in a series of sculptures, installations and drawings appropriately displayed in the vitrines of the Municipal Authority of Prague 1 and in a more extended form in the cellar of the Stone Bell House.

From Goethe’s many visits to Karlsbad, where he worked on geological research while selling stones to the tourists that went there for cure, to Kafka’s metaphorical story “The Burrow”, Reitmeier brings to our attention ignored spaces and protagonists of urban lives lead in the underground.

Goethe was a so called Neptunist and believed a primordial lake to be the origin of all stones whereas the rivalling group of Plutonists was convinced that volcanoes created all geological elements.

The mole-like being of ‘The Burrow’ creates his life in an elaborate system of tunnels it has built over the course of its life - serving as a metaphor for the many passages and underground systems of Prague, be it the metro, historical catacombs or the vastest data cable network in Europe - which create almost a parallel pedestrian system - but also bigger issues of who owns the ground and what happens there, when we are used to often only look at the surface of the city. Even though it seems almost like a cliché to deal with Kafka when working in Prague - exactly this notion relates to what tourists very often come to see and what the city itself is exploiting as its cultural capital. Parallely, these hidden spaces of the public sphere not only stratify the geology and infrastructure of a city but also reflect parallel lines of social strata for instance providing temporary shelter for the homeless.

In Reitmeier’s installations different fields and notions from geology, architecture, fashion, collecting, psychoanalysis, surveillance and history converge and become a medium to observe, discover and rethink the city differently.

Lisa Reitmeier was born in 1984 in Trostberg, Germany. She lives and works in Munich, Germany.

Power systems and body structures, rituals and cruelty are the subjects of Lisa Reitmeiers work. Together with the human body, its integrity and its modification, these concepts create a constitution that questions to what extent the performativity of violence and ritual form the human psyche. Experimental clash of materials and an emergent working process lead to extensive installations resembling walkable psychograms (a mixture of crime scene, research laboratory, psychoanalysis and intimacy). This performance of materials reveals how the formation of the psyche destroys as well as recreates interpersonal space, leading to both trauma and healing.

Reitmeier graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and was an artist resident at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam from 2014-2016. Her work has been shown at Hospitality in Cologne, Rijksakademie Amsterdam, Kunstverein Diepenheim and EYE Museum Amsterdam amongst others.

www.lisareitmeier.com

Sofie Thorsen (*1971, DK)


Florentinum, courtyard
Na Florenci 15, Nové město
50°05'20.7"N 14°26'07.9"E
Ensemble of sculptures & video work

Zaha Hadid, medieval city walls, trash pits, wells and remnants of former 14th-century houses, shapes of history translated into sculptural vessels holding a fluid process of constant urban change.

Excavation, 2018


Next to the Masaryk train station right at the borders of the Prague city center and its historical demarcation by former heavy fortification, a new business district is being constructed, crowned by a large multi-functional structure designed by Zaha Hadid Architects. Before the actual construction, extensive archaeological research was concluded, unearthing remnants of houses from the 14th-century as well as 16th-century gardens full of historical artifacts of varying importance. “You can dig anywhere in Prague, and you will always find something valuable”, said the main archaeologist responsible for the excavation site. The city is layered in many strata, each period represented at a certain depth in the ground. Since it is needed to make space for the foundations and underground floors of the new buildings, every single evidence of history is being removed from the site, catalogued and preserved.

Sofie Thorsen, fascinated by the process of renewal of the city structure, decided to secure more than just individual artifacts, and literally conserve the character of the ground itself. Making large-scale casts of the pits spread across the excavation site, rendering homage to the spots where the construction took place and waste accumulated over the course of time. These pits, negative spaces, curved and amorphous speak with a strong sculptural language, allowing three time periods to meet in Sofie Thorsen’s objects and in her video work: long gone history represented by the excavation site, more recent times of the train station and the foreseeable future of the new business center. All these timelines are manifested in the decision to preserve something as ephemeral, as undefined yet outlined as holes in the ground - made centuries ago, reopened during the last couple of months and enclosed again, possibly for good.

Sofie Thorsen was born 1971 in Århus, Denmark. She lives and works in Vienna, Austria.

In her installations, films and works on paper, Sofie Thorsen deals with questions of space and architecture in urban space as well as the exhibition context itself. Whereas the starting point of her work is mostly research based or documentary, the images and materials that surface during the research are reworked and developed into abstract objects and images that constitute the final work.

A graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, she has shown her work internationally in numerous group and solo exhibitions. She held a teaching position at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna from 2005 to 2009. Her work has been shown among others at Kunstbüro, Mumok Kino, Krobath Galerie, Leopold Museum, MAK/ Vienna Biennial, 21er Haus, all in Vienna; Anhava Galerie, Helsinki; House of Arts České Budějovice, Kunsthaus Düsseldorf, Krobath Berlin; Austrian Cultural Forum, New York City; etc.

www.sofiethorsen.net

MAP

01 Hynek Alt

02 Matyáš Chochola

03 Jasmina Cibic

04 Viktor Dedek

05 Deniz Eroglu
15 Boris Ondreička
16 Lisa Reitmeier

06 Feld72

07 Liam Gillick

08 Anna Hulačová

09 Christian Jankowski

10 Barbara Kapusta

11 David Maljković

12 Christoph Meier

13 Ute Müller


14 Antonis Pittas

14 Antonis Pittas

15 Boris Ondreička

16 Lisa Reitmeier

16 Lisa Reitmeier

17 Sofie Thorsen

Mariánské nám. 5

50.0906, 14.42255

Václavské nám. 68

50.07955, 14.41872

Staroměstské nám. 13

50.09194, 14.40899

Karlovo nám. 13

nám. J. Palacha

Národní 4

Václavské nám. 43

Jungmannovo nám. 18

Revoluční 30

Nám. Franze Kafky

Pod Bruskou 3

Staroměstské nám. 3

Vodičkova 18

Staroměstské nám. 1

Na Florenci 15

Check out the locations

Check out the locations

PROGRAM

Opening:


June 8, 6 PM at CAMP (Center for Architecture and Metropolitan Planning)
Vyšehradská 51, Praha 2

6pm - Introductory words, informal drinks, presentation of profile videos of selected artists

7pm - panel discussion with the artists (Hynek Alt, Matyáš Chochola, Jasmina Cibic, Viktor Dedek, Anna Hulačová, Christian Jankowski, Barbara Kapusta, David Maljković, Antonis Pittas, Boris Ondreička, Lisa Reitmeier, Sofie Thorsen)

The artists present for the opening will discuss with the curators this year’s concept of the festival, their experiences in Prague, conceptual reasoning and implementation of their new site specific works in relation to their overall practices as well as the potential and limitations of art in public space as a critical instrument.

10pm - performance Playing Spree to Moldau and Vice Versa of Christian Jankowski at the river bank of Vltava

Performances:


Viktor Dedek
June 11 (4pm)
Location: Courtyard, passageway between Spálená and Opatovická streets

Christian Jankowski
June 8 (10pm)
June 9 (11pm)
Location: nám. Jana Palacha

Boris Ondreička
July 3, September 6
Stone Bell House (cellar)

Matyáš Chochola
September 18, 6pm
Location: Kozí plácek (intersection of Kozí and Haštalská streets)

For more information, go to section ARTISTS.

Guided tours:


After June 19th, every Tuesday 3pm (in English) and 5pm (in Czech)
Stone Bell House (cellar)

For groups:
Every Tuesday before noon. Reservation required at info@bubec.cz.

Guided tours with curators:
July 3, 4pm
September 18, 4pm
Klarov, in front of Zenger Transformer Substation

Guided tours with Pavel Karous (within the program „Aliens and Herons“ organized by the Prague City Gallery):
July 7, 3pm
July 14, 3pm
Stone Bell House (cellar)

Workshops for children:


Come enjoy an interactive tour around selected installations of contemporary art. You can choose between a guided tour with a lecturer and a self-guided tour using worksheets that will be provided for free. The aim of the tours is to help you get closer to the content of the individual artworks. There are 3 routes available.

Route 1: Under the Facade
A journey to the historical and architectural layers of the city.

Route 2: Man and the City
How do we talk to each other? Me, you, and the city?

Route 3: Time
The perception of time in various places of the city. What is it like to be alone in the city? Does time run faster on the square, or in the cellar?

Each route takes about an hour. For further information on the start times of each route and to sign up, contact monika@bubec.cz. The worksheets will be freely available at the Stone BellHouse during the opening hours (Tuesday to Sunday | 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.).

Workshop dates: June 9 & 10, August 25, September 8, 9, 15 & 16. All start at 1pm, 2.30pm and 4pm.

The exhibition and all programs are free.
























































ABOUT

BUBEC, o.p.s. presents the second edition of the m3 / Art in Space Festival, that takes place in the historical center of Prague, Jun 9th - Sept 30th.

VICE VERSA: Our Earth is Their Moon, Our Moon is Their Earth”, is the title of this years m3 festival and a phrase borrowed from Ursula Le Guin's 1974 utopian Sci-Fi novel The Dispossessed it underlines a dual coexistence of two opposing, yet mutually dependent and intertwined civilisations. In the context of a festival of art in public space it relates to issues of a wide discrepancy between the general public and the professional art audience, questions regarding the various levels of social hierarchy in the population inhabiting the city, same as the peculiar relationship of local residents to short-term visitors.

The city centre of Prague vibrates with impulses of the constant tourist influx. Groups of visitors on their sightseeing tours, filling their phones and SD cards with endless amounts of images, spring break or stag night crews running around masked as pirates, genitals, or Soviet soldiers are plundering the streets and leaving unprecedentedly high tips in overpriced bars, where no residents would ever go to. Everything seems to be in order. Not much space for complaints anymore, since this is the way how the city has been developing since the radical post-communist transformation after the Fall of the Berlin Wall. Possibly one other shift is comparable to 1989, namely the introduction of cheap low-cost flights, remarkably enlarging the numbers of young visitors.

It's harder and harder to find any locals actually living in the centre, since the prices have rocketed skyhigh and it's even hard to talk about gentrification at this point, since everything seems to be orchestrated in mutual acceptance of the city itself, developers and smaller businesses, all profiting from the given conditions. Exploitation goes far beyond the scale of the touristic industry, the cultural and historical richness of the city is adapting to serve the fast pace of populistic requirements comparable to the strategies of a hollywood blockbuster.

Critical sensitivity rarely finds a place in the public discussion and a fact supported by the level of general lack of interest.

Nothing is completely lost though. The historical significance of the city, the richness of its cultural and subcultural movements are still there to a large extent, just out of sight of the global public. You have to look for hidden treasures, be patient and curious.

Such is the approach of VICE VERSA, carefully implementing on various scales and timelines a variety of approaches and artistic media into the fabric of the city taking shape as new site-responsive occurrences. Ranging from loud statements, to very subtle ones, some almost invisible interventions or commentaries relating to both historical and current and trying to assess a possible future of the city.

STORYLINE:

Since the beginning of Autumn 2017, artists from different parts of the world have been coming to Prague for an extensive research of the city as a hub of both historical and contemporary issues followed and developed by the artists through their respective practices. Since the start of conceptual preparation of the festival, the intention of the curators has been since the start of conceptual preparation of the festival to bring various different perspectives from foreign and local artists, whose interests are creating a scale of possible approaches to pressing problems and downfalls of the current state of the city of Prague, same as to its richness and various historical treasures, those ones present in the broader public discourse, same as hidden, or forgotten ones. Each artist is formulating hers or his thoughts through a plethora of medias, spanning from a neon sign, underground mystic diagram and monumental sculpture to contemplative film or a wall text. Throughout the research itself, both the artists and the curators completely changed their perspective of the city, which they were either well acquainted with, or visited for the first time. Multiple layers of understanding were unfolded, folded again and revaluated to comprehend more personally the tangible presence of history on every single step during almost endless walks back and forth in the streets, squares, parks and hills, same as passages, cinemas, university lecture halls, exhibition spaces or underground tunnels. References to the local culture: architecture, fine arts, applied arts, literature and film are forming yet another plane of understanding translated into each single work. After all these experiences VICE VERSA is leaving a traditional and established format of presentations of art in public space, based on utilisation of primary outdoor public spaces and stepping largely into semi-public and semi-private areas, which are broadening, but at the same time focusing the curatorial intention, thus presenting not only a festival of sculptures and interventions, but also a presentation of complex thoughts and considerations of the local context.


CREDITS:

Organized by BUBEC, o.p.s.
www.bubec.cz
Radouňova 1, Řeporyje
IČ 70824185
info@bubec.cz

CURATED BY
Significant Other: Laura Amann & Jen Kratochvil

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Čestmír Suška

FESTIVAL ARTISTIC BOARD
Kateřina Frejlachová and Olga Škochová (Prague Institute of Planning and Development), Marie Foltýnová (Prague City Gallery), Vojtěch Míča (Academy of Fine Arts in Prague), Dominik Lang (Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague), Pavel Karous.

PRODUCED BY
Petra Špačková, Iv Vodičková, Marek Volf

PR AND MARKETING
Tatiana Brederová
tatiana@bubec.cz,
+420 728 114 927

VISUAL MOTIF
Liam Gillick

GRAPHIC DESIGN
finkner.me

PRESS KIT

INFO POINT
Stone Bell House, cellar
Staroměstské nám. 13, Staré Město
Open: Tue–Sun, 2PM–8PM


Organised by BUBEC, o.p.s.

General partner

Main partner

Media partners

Partners

The festival is held under the patronage of Prague mayor Adriana Krnáčová, city councillor Jan Wolf and Prague 1 district mayor Oldřich Lomecký.